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Gaby Wood on the unsolved case of JonBenet Ramsey

Gaby Wood on the unsolved case of JonBenet Ramsey

I found this article and was instantly drawn in by the intriguing way they told the story. The title, "getting away with murder" is very suiting. This is another website summarizing the murder story but this was certainly lured me in more than others. It begins the way all others do, the story that unfolded one day after Christmas in a family home. A kidnapping that evolved into a homicide. The crime scene which ultimately was the destroyed solution to the problem. The first murder to take place that entire year in Boulder. Along with the unexperienced police who had never investigated a murder before. This article focused on the interesting facts and left out less interesting ones. In this way, it became a story I could not stop reading. Even though I have read the case story many times, this one popped out and still made me want to read more.

theguardian.com
JonBenet Ramsey family friend supports sensational theory brother killed her

JonBenet Ramsey family friend supports sensational theory brother killed her

This article is about the Ramsey's family friend, Judith Phillips, who believes in the theory that Burke Ramsey unintentionally killed his little sister. In the year before her death, it is said that Burke and JonBenet got in a fight and Burke left a scare on her forehead out of anger. He hit her with a golf club. People believe something similar took place the night of her death. Judith claims that Burke could have been jealous. She says that before JonBenet was born Burke was his parent's world, and after she was born she took all of their attention. She claimed it was odd how they gave a huge television interview, but not work with the police investigators. Judith believes in this theory, "I agree with the theory Burke killed JonBenet but I don’t think he meant to do it. I think Patsy did everything in her power to protect her living child. I think she wrote the ransom note whilst John staged the scene in the basement." I think this is a pretty logical theory that will never be able to be proved unless admitted by one of the Ramseys. She said that after the police were called Patsy invited friends and John disappeared for around an hour and a half. She thinks that at this time, John was disposing of any leftover evidence. The article ends with little to no closure. This was a very interesting angle for me to read on. The fact that their own family friend believes in this theory says a lot.

mirror.co.uk
Judith Miller Is Afraid JonBenet Won't Get Justice

Judith Miller Is Afraid JonBenet Won't Get Justice

This article is again about family friend, Judith. As the police once again look over the case years later they interview family friends to hear their opinions. Judith says she "fears that JonBenet will never receive the justice that she deserves". She was filmed for a detailed interview from the makers of "The Case Of: JonBenet Ramsey". Judith claims her and Patsy were very close friends. Judith was a photographer and was the one who took the pictures that were published of the Ramsey family. Judith claims they were social people who "had lots of friends. You always felt really welcome when you walked through the door." Judith said she saw a complete change in her friend's character after the death of JonBenet. Judith says that the Ramseys instructed them to not talk to interviewers or police investigators. Judith did not listen the Ramseys and decided if there was anything she knew to aid in the solving of the case, she would not keep silent. She says that twenty years later she's still mad over the case and believes the case will never be solved.

bustle.com
Tutor Tips: Creative Writing

Tutor Tips: Creative Writing

This is another website on tips for creative writing. This genre is the mixture between literary art and research nonfiction. Different from standard nonfiction, create nonfiction incorporates the nonfiction facts with fiction literary devices to create a more interesting and story-like writing. This article is written and bullets and easy for me to follow along and stay on track with. Creative nonfiction should, "include accurate and well-researched information, hold the interest of the reader, and potentially blur the realms of fact and fiction in a pleasing, literary style (while remaining grounded in fact). This article says that creative nonfiction can be just as creative and intriguing as fiction as long as you remain in the facts and stay in the truth of the story. Creative nonfiction is continuously evolving. The rest of the article discussed memoirs and personal essays. This is not what I will be writing on. The tips on creative nonfiction were less straight forward than others and left more room for interpretation. It engaged the whole creative aspect of the genre.

uvm.edu
50 Narrative Devices for Non-fiction Storytellers | Aerogramme Writers' Studio

50 Narrative Devices for Non-fiction Storytellers | Aerogramme Writers' Studio

“In a world getting more complex and fast moving all the time, the need for good objective storytelling is more vital than ever.” It is important to know how the brain reacts to stories. For example, well written stories play with these areas of our brains to react to the right emotions. Empathize with your audience in order to connect with them and draw them in. Tell stories that are relevant to everyone. Make them have a meaningful message about the world. Create conflict and fear that will drive reader's interests. Treat your characters as onions and slowly reveal their personalities throughout the story to draw in the interest of those reading. Make sure to be sensitive and aware of human feelings. Create themes that are ultimately universal, the most important one is love. These are a few story writing techniques will aid in the development of the character in my essay. Since I am making up the speaker's stories I will be sure to pay attention to these tips.

aerogrammestudio.com
Non-Fiction Narrative Techniques

Non-Fiction Narrative Techniques

This article lists and describes five non-fiction narrative techniques. They are: characterization, place, form, voice, and blurring fact and fiction. It introduces the idea of "creative non-fiction" which is created to "make nonfiction stories read like fiction so that your readers are as enthralled by fact as they are by fantasy". This is similar to what I am doing in my writing. I am incorporating a made up story with a true crime case. The facts of the case are real, but the person's life is made up in order to interest readers. This genre of writing is created to incorporate real life situations while captivating people's imaginations and unfolding the underlying truth of the factual story. Characterization is turning the real life characters from your story to characters in your essay. It is important to select necessary characters who will add to the development of the story. Place is "often key to effective narrative nonfiction". It is important you establish a detailed setting so that a mood can be developed. This will also aid in the development of the characters and help you better understand them. Narrative nonfiction does not always include rising action, climax, and falling action. Instead, it "tends to be a hybrid of poetic and narrative techniques, often weaving different stories together in alternating sections." The structure is a reflection of the meaning. There is not a lot describing voice. They say that voice includes the "author's tone, or attitude and point of view, his distance from the subject." Lastly, they include blurring facts and fiction to establish the creative non-fiction genre. In this you "enhance the narrative while retaining the event's core truth." You do not always have to tell the story exactly as it has been told over and over again. If you write it differently you will obtain the interest of your readers because it will be something new. This article was useful to me because I am going to be incorporating a made up character with a real life story.

penandthepad.com
Writing Creative Nonfiction: A Toolbox of Techniques

Writing Creative Nonfiction: A Toolbox of Techniques

This article describes the "the toolbox of techniques that writers are expected to use when writing creative nonfiction". It is smart to begin by choosing a topic and creating a question around it. This way, your question will create a purpose for your writing, There are five popular nonfiction writing structures. They are, "Narrative structure: Telling the story chronologically, from beginning to end, Braided Structure: Telling a story by weaving or combining two, sometimes three, narratives or stories, Collage: Using a thematic and segmented approach that combines a quotation or two, poem, scene, metaphor, simile, allusion, personification, image, vignette, anecdote, a short, short, true story, with an epiphany, Frame: Telling a story by opening with a particular scene or reflecting and closing with a particular scene or reflection, Narrative with Flashback: Telling a story using scene, summary, reflection, and flashbacks." Within these types of writings you discover the truth of the story as you right. Include many details; however, only include details that are relevant and necessary to your purpose. Use "language that invokes the sense of sight, smell, taste, touch, or hearing". To creates scenes in people's head one should "Setting-time and place of the story, action-something happens, dialogue-someone something not always, vivid description-concrete and specific details, imagery-language that invokes the reader’s sense of sight, smell, taste, touch, hearing, point of View-first, second, third person, figurative language, such as simile and metaphor,
and beginning, middle, and ending-A scene has a beginning, middle, and end." It goes on to mention literary devices you can use. The article says to make sure you are on topic and answering your question with a strong voice. It says to variate your sentence structure and change up the syntax. These tips were more factual and straight forward. To me, they were more like common sense. It just reviewed over things we were already taught about in grammar class.

davehood59.wordpress.com
5 Nonfiction Writing Techniques That Will Keep Readers Turning Pages

5 Nonfiction Writing Techniques That Will Keep Readers Turning Pages

This is a brief article on the author's most useful writing tips. I think that if there are only five, they most likely will be filled with helpful information. It is important to tell a memorable story that will make a mark on reader's and be something they don't quickly forget. Writing is more relatable if "you include little examples, experiences and comparisons" in your work. For example, "instead of saying “Spinach is healthy,” you could tell a story about a runner who improved his performance by eating a lot of spinach." This will "hit home with the reader". Not only should you include a hook, but you should continue to grasp the reader's interests from the beginning all the way to the end. Questions to ask yourself when writing are, "Does your first sentence make the reader want to read the second? Does your second sentence evoke curiosity for the third?" Some idea to starting off your work are, "beginning with a little personal or historical story, ask a question that moves your audience, and start with an interesting or funny thought." In writing, do not include to much facts but remember to include emotions. "Use more imagery, more emotion and more personality." For example, "Instead of writing 'double-digit percent fluctuations,' write, 'a rollercoaster ride of ups and downs.'" By using examples like this, the writing is more relatable and easier to follow along with. The article says to not include to dense of information but instead to "Provide even more value for your reader by cutting the content down into easily digestible bites." The last tip is to keep readers on their toes for the whole of the writing and "Provide even more value for your reader by cutting the content down into easily digestible bites." Even though this article had only five tips, they were each broken down and explained with a connecting example. I will use these tips when writing my true crime essay.

thewritelife.com
54 Tips to Improve Your Nonfiction Writing - Daring to Live Fully

54 Tips to Improve Your Nonfiction Writing - Daring to Live Fully

54 tips is a lot to write on so I am going to mention the ones that stuck out most to me that I will use when writing. The first tip on where to begin was reading other great writers to look for "For inspiration, to grasp the art of language, to learn effective writing techniques, and to appreciate the nuances of words." The article also says to "Write With Authority" because if you aren't certain on your own ideas and opinions then readers will question your own authority. Everytime you write something you need to "decide on your purpose, goal, or aim for writing." Diction is important, "Choose the Right Word". Write in an organized way and "each paragraph should develop logically from the previous one". Know when to use "who" or "whom", and "I" and "me". I have already been told this but I thought it was useful to write down as a reminder to "Avoid Clichés". By using these few tips I believe my writing will be more intriguing for readers and allow myself to better portray my ideas onto the paper.

daringtolivefully.com
25 Tips To Make You a Better Nonfiction Writer  | WritersDigest.com

25 Tips To Make You a Better Nonfiction Writer | WritersDigest.com

This post is written by Mike Sager. It begins with a short word from this author on what he has learned in his writing experience and continues with a list of 25 tops to making you a better nonfiction writer. He says, "the only aspect of my career over which I feel I have total control. Words on the screen." This is a strong sentence and shows the power in word choice because it is the only thing you can control. You can control the words they read but not the feelings they obtain from them. In his writing, "From [his] first word to [his] last, [he] works hard to service and reward [his] readers. [He] wants to reel them in and take them on a journey. [He] wants to play with their heads a little. [He] wants to dazzle them a little. There’s got to be surprises along the way. And there needs to be a good ending." He says no matter the type of writing you are working on "originality is the key" and path to success, it is what makes your writing yours. If your having trouble being original he wants writers to remember, "Get an imagination. If it’s been done before, find a different way to do it. If it’s been said before, find a different way to say it." One tip very helpful to me is, " If you can’t find the killer declarative sentence to lede with, use an evocative scene-setting description." Others that stuck out are, "Use your words to make pictures, use all five senses, Go through your copy and eliminate as many recurrences of “that” you can find, what you don’t describe is just as important as what you do describe–omission invites the reader to fill in some of the details themselves, and rely on nouns and verbs more than adjectives and adverbs. These tips were extremely helpful and covered many angles of writing. Some of these tips and ideas I had never heard of before, while others were a reminder. I am excited to better pay attention when writing and to use these tips to better my works.

writersdigest.com