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1984 Artifact Assignment

Anna Novak Hour 3

The song of my dreams. by amrutha (write #2)

The song of my dreams. by amrutha (write #2)

George Orwell’s book 1984 is an excellent example of what can happen when language is used to intentionally control a population, resulting in a loss of individuality and emotional expression. Language is incredibly powerful and can be used to express and create, but it can also be used to stamp out and limit individualism and creativity. The poem The song of my dreams by amrutha is the other side of language. It is expressive and uses language to develop the author's feelings and emotions, something that has been taken away in 1984. When Winston holds Julia he describes it as a “political act”, not an act of love or even passion, but political (138). The party and its new language of Newspeak takes away the ability to express emotion, especially love. The poem demonstrates what could have been if the Party wasn’t in control. Without that inhibitor the author of the poem is able to feel and share how “you shine brighter” when you love someone. The biggest contributor to a loss of individuality and choice is the introduction of Newspeak. Newspeak is designed to “narrow the range of thought”, and to make it impossible to even think of something the party doesn’t want you to think of (58). The taking away of language truly is the taking away of emotion and individuality and will cause a population to descend into a society that doesn’t have any need or want other than to serve the party. The author of the poem is again a good example of what is lost in this world of limited language and expression. The simplest ideas and emotions, ones that are central to our society as we know it are lost. Even expressing a wish to have someone “love me” becomes impossible. Not only is romantic love limited, but even the love between friends and family is lost. Children report their parents, and friendships are practically nonexistent. All because the party sought to limit and abolish thoughtcrime. Because the real danger of thoughtcrime is that it leads to the creation of individuality and then to emotions the party doesn’t want. Once people develop their own emotions they are nearly impossible to control. Which is exactly why the introduction of Newspeak is so critical to the success and longevity of the party. The longer the people have individuality and emotional range, the higher the chances someone overthrows the party or starts a rebellion.

hellopoetry.com
Do As Your Told by Renee45 (write #1)

Do As Your Told by Renee45 (write #1)

The poem Do As Your Told by Renee45 and George Orwell’s book 1984 both focus on the idea of control, and lead the reader to the conclusion that control comes in many forms, and simply questioning that control can be the catalyst to a change in the balance of power. In 1984 Winston works for the Party, but secretly has doubts as to whether or not the Party is really deserving of the amount of control they have. He also questions whether life was “better before the Revolution than it is now?” (102) As he starts to question their control, he begins to do things that could get him arrested by the Party. And once he starts to diverge from the Party’s laws he decides to “take the risk of revisiting” those forbidden places (110). Winston’s character shows the effects of questioning who has control and why. Simply changing his thinking has changed his actions and has already started to affect his life. It will likely also set in motion a bigger movement that could have huge effects on the society. In the poem Do What Your Told the author also questions the control government has over the people. The government has no way of knowing “what’s best for me” and cannot possibly dictate every aspect of its citizens lives without some protest. Which is exactly why Winston began to wonder if things were better before the revolution. The poem expresses feeling like life is not happening “how it was meant to be” and questions why certain people or groups have all the control. This poem speaks a lot about control by those who don’t deserve it, and reflects the dystopian theme of outside control. Both the book and poem connect to humanity’s fear of losing control. We generally hate being left out of decisions, plans, and being unable to decide for ourselves what is right and wrong. This idea is expressed in many different ways in both the book and the poem, but more importantly can be found all over human ideas, governments, and societies.

allpoetry.com