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Sheri Edwards
Sheri Edwards
Go boldly and scatter seeds of kindness.askwhatelse.wordpress.comwhatelse.edublogs.org

Does the US have requirements for animals like Australia does?

While reading about the problem Australia has with protecting their wildlife from animals coming into their country, I wondered if the United States also has requirements.

Australia warns travelers to not bring in hitchhiking toads

Australia warns travelers to not bring in hitchhiking toads

"Australian quarantine authorities have urged travelers through Asia to avoid bringing in hitchhiking amphibians. "

"Australia has some of the world's toughest quarantine regulations. These are in a bid to keep pests and diseases from infiltrating its isolated borders and destroying the country's unique wildlife."

Key words: quarantine, regulations, animals, biohazard, pests, diseases

Animals from other countries are hazardous to the wildlife in the country they are brought into. They may be pests that take over, or they may bring diseases. Because of this, many countries have regulations to protect their own wildlife; they quarantine, or hold, certain animals and plants that may harm the country's ecosystem. This article explains toads, snakes, and dogs brought into Australia are quarantined.

Does the United States have similar rules?

tweentribune.com
USDA APHIS | APHIS Pet Travel

USDA APHIS | APHIS Pet Travel

This website is the official Department of Agriculture site for the United States. You can search for the regulations for your pet or other type of animal to find out what you need to do.
Key words: regulations, requirements, animals, travel, pets,

"Animals entering the U.S. may be subject to regulation by USDA APHIS as all well as other federal agencies. Depending on your destination state, your pet may need to also meet additional health requirements."

So the United States has regulations and a place to get information so you can prepare for the journey.

aphis.usda.gov
General entrance requirements for guests travelling with pets

General entrance requirements for guests travelling with pets

PDF won't show up: https://www.westjet.com/assets/wj-web/documents/en/travel-info/pet-general-entrance-requirements.pdf
Key words: regulations, pets, travel, vaccinations [against disease]

There is obviously a concern for spreading disease.

This article from Canada's WestJet explains the regulations for traveling to the US and other countries with pets.
"Most dogs travelling to the U.S. will require a valid rabies certificate signed by a licensed veterinarian that indicates that the dog has had their rabies vaccination no less than one month before arrival."
"Puppies must be older than four months of age to be imported to the United States and must be vaccinated against rabies no less than one month before arrival."
Cats don't need vaccinations, although some states have regulations. It's important to know the regulations and the document provides links to regulatory agencies for more information.

westjet.com
7 CFR 318.13-1 - Notice of quarantine.

7 CFR 318.13-1 - Notice of quarantine.

"(a) Under the authority of section 412 of the Plant Protection Act, the Secretary of Agriculture may prohibit or restrict the movement in interstate commerce of any plant or plant"

Key word: regulation, pests, plants

If you click the 'text' link, you find the regulation proposal:
"regulations regarding the movement of plant pests to
propose criteria regarding the movement and environmental release of
biological control organisms, and to establish regulations to allow the
importation and movement in interstate commerce of certain types of
plant pests without restriction by granting exceptions from permitting
requirements for those pests."

Yes, there are regulations in the United States about plants and animals moving across state lines and into the country. One of these documents discusses letting people release Monarch Butterflies because they are endangered.

"The majority of the comments that we received were from schools and
students who requested that we continue to allow the environmental
release of Monarch butterflies as part of a learning curriculum."

law.cornell.edu