Create Content in Minutes

Get Started For Free

Artifact

'I watched an entire flat Earth convention – here's what I learned'

'I watched an entire flat Earth convention – here's what I learned'

independent.co.uk
Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit

The book “Fahrenheit 451” and the an article about “flat-earthers” both explore the idea that some individuals reject knowledge of the past and that that knowledge cannot be trusted. The article by Harry T Dyer entitled “I watched an entire flat Earth convention – here's what I learned” explores the flat-Earth society that believes earth is flat despite the overwhelming proof from the past because they believe that it is fabricated by the government as stated in this quote, “While flat earthers seem to trust and support scientific methods, what they don’t trust is scientists, and the established relationships between “power” and “knowledge”. This relationship between power and knowledge has long been theorised by sociologists.” The future that Fahrenheit 451 shows is one where knowledge from books has been rejected by the people because they believe the authors are spreading lies as mentioned in page 57 when Beatty is explaining why books are outlawed, “Colored people don’t like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people don’t feel good about Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Burn it. Someone’s written a book on tobacco and cancer in the lungs? The cigarette people are weeping? Burn the book.” Both quotes describe the people’s disbelief in others ideals and willingness to destroy evidence that states otherwise. Another theme is blind trust in those that are not attached to the government. The article about the flat-earthers describes the society’s willingness to believe those that have their own ideas and theory as stated in the second to last paragraph, “Flat earthers were encouraged to trust “poetry, freedom, passion, vividness, creativity, and yearning” over the more clinical regurgitation of established theories and facts.” In the sixth page of the book Montag denies Charisse’s statement about firemen even though there is proven evidence of the contrary, “Is it true that long ago firemen put fires out instead of going to start them? No. Houses have always been fireproof take my word for it.” Both sources discuss some people's trust in those who might not have the right information. Both Montag and the people in the article believe in things that may be proven otherwise by science and research. Belief in something that may not be entirely factual is a similarity that the characters in the book and the people in the article have, though blind belief may not be a bad thing at first it can lead to detrimental effects if it causes unnecessary and irrational argument and violence as seen in the book and in our world today.

accounts.google.com