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Autism Curation

Supporting students with autism in the classroom: what teachers need to know

Supporting students with autism in the classroom: what teachers need to know

This article acts as an information tool and instruction guide for how, in this modern era, teachers need to support and assist children with autism in the classroom. the article mentions how in a time where education is the focus of our society, people with autism absolutely require one despite the difficulties and challenges present in attaining this. Due to the fact that the brains of those with autism are wired in a different way to those without ASD, functioning autistic children learn in a different way, often not being able to fully understand a social setting which then impacts their learning in a classroom. this article endeavours to show to teachers or guardians the absolute significance of helping those with ASD and guiding them that one step further in order to enable them an education and therefore a future brighter than what it would be without one. By helping these children with an education, they are simultaneously constantly developing numerous other skills in their brains which will further enhance their capabilities to interact and connect with the world around them.

theconversation.com
Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

“People are so afraid of variety that they try to fit everything into a tiny little box with a specific label." Rosie King delivers a speech on the topic of her own personal experience having ASD or being 'autistic'. Her most prominent point is that everybody in this day and age is trying to achieve normality and trying to 'fix' anything that isn't, however, she says that if someone gave you the compliment of "wow you are so normal!" it isn't actually a compliment. People compliment others by saying how extraordinary they are and how well they think out of the box which is precisely what autism is. She essentially speaks of how autism has allowed her to be herself.

ted.com
I am NOT Autistic, You are NOT Normal (Cover of Prince Ea's I am NOT Black, You are NOT Wh

I am NOT Autistic, You are NOT Normal (Cover of Prince Ea's I am NOT Black, You are NOT Wh

A girl puts a spotlight on the idea that our opinions are shaped by a conformist society, one that puts a a distinction between black and white but fails to see the grey. This girl alludes to the concept that no one is autistic and no one is normal and that people are simply people and that they are only viewed as normal or in this case autistic due to society's irrational criteria for each. Ultimately, this speech is saying that everybody has different strengths and weaknesses and everyone has an extremely different molecular make up of their body and brain to everyone else and therefore the term 'autism' or the label of being 'autistic' is only a label set by the society in which we find ourselves.

youtube.com
Relationship between brain stem volume and aggression in children diagnosed with autism

Relationship between brain stem volume and aggression in children diagnosed with autism

In a study done by the Brigham Young university in the USA, neuroimaging data was examined of the brains of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and compared to neuroimaging data of the brains of people without ASD to determine what factors in the brain account for levels of aggression. this study, which consisted of 63 male children-45 with ASD and 18 without- found that there was a higher chance of a child being in the higher aggression group if they had a smaller brainstem volume. The study's findings enable a more scientific insight into why there is a higher likelihood that some children with ASD might develop aggressive tendencies and why others might not.

sciencedirect.com
A double shot of happiness: Tim & Judy Sharp at TEDxSydney 2014

A double shot of happiness: Tim & Judy Sharp at TEDxSydney 2014

Tim Sharp was diagnosed with Autism at age three, his mother was told that she should "put him away and forget about him". Ignoring this advice, Judy Sharp, a single mother of two young sons, tried everything she could think of to communicate with Tim, including drawing. Tim is now an internationally acclaimed 25 year-old Australian artist and his artistic creation, the quirky super hero Laser Beak Man is world famous.

Tim's creativity has seen him become the first person in the world with Autism to have his art turned into an animated television series screening on the ABC and internationally. In 2012, a film about Tim was shown in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. His art is sold to collectors from around the world and in 2012, Tim's collaboration with a young rock band from Nashville Tennessee inspired a music festival raising awareness of Autism. Judy is currently working on a book about her life with Tim.

youtube.com
Autism Discussion Panel

Autism Discussion Panel

A panel that discusses the prominent cues and behaviours that come with autism. There is a particular focus on the different levels of the spectrum and how mild or severe the autism can be. The panel consists of Randy Mitchell, a parent of a Low-Functioning autistic son, Caleb. Katy Tile, a behaviour consultant at Geneva Centre for Autism, and Sarah Parsha Perry, Board Certified Behaviour Analyst (BCBA). Both Randy and Katy give their story of their own personal struggles and journies with their kids who have been diagnosed with autism.

youtube.com
Life, Animated Movie Review & Film Summary (2016) | Roger Ebert

Life, Animated Movie Review & Film Summary (2016) | Roger Ebert

When Owen Suskind was three years old, his motor and language skills deteriorated, seemingly overnight. After Owen Suskind's motor and language skills seemingly deteriorated overnight at age three, his parents took him to see specialists in the hope of finding a cure.since it was the 1990s, autism or the concept of the spectrum were not part of common knowledge. Despite being diagnosed with autism, his family discovered that 'The Little Mermaid' and 'The Lion King' and other Disney movies enabled Owen to access his emotions and develop reading, writing and communication skills. This further resulted in Owen learning to understand complex social cues and reconnect with the world around him.

rogerebert.com
Why Do Kids with Autism Do That?

Why Do Kids with Autism Do That?

This text is a collation of research that delves into some of the reasons behind common behaviours associated with autism. For example this includes why children on the autism spectrum might avoid eye contact, cover their face/eyes/ear with their hands, startle easily or have an obsessive nature. Thematically, this research is fitting with the novel, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time as it discusses the behaviour of people on the autism spectrum. This research was collated by the Seattle Children's Hospital and was written by Lynn Vigo, MSW, LICSW.

theautismblog.seattlechildrens