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Black Like Me (Orange)

Opinion | Portland isn’t Portlandia. It’s a capital of white supremacy.
washingtonpost.com

Opinion | Portland isn’t Portlandia. It’s a capital of white supremacy.

This article is about the brutal attack that a white supremacist did against two men, where he stabbed and killed them. A white man was harassing two women, one woman who was black and one who was a muslim. He was shouting at them to go back to their country and that they didn’t belong here. Two men overheard this man saying these hateful things to the women and intervened, but the man stabbed both of them. In Portland Ore, racism is still alive and many people who live there are white supremacist. And racism is a huge deal in the state. It all traced back to the states roots.
-Julia

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How Black Lives Matter Uses Social Media to Fight the Power
wired.com

How Black Lives Matter Uses Social Media to Fight the Power

“In the 1960’s, if you were a civil rights worker stationed in the Deep South and you needed to get some urgent news out to the rest of the world—word of a beating or an activist’s arrest or some brewing state of danger, you would likely head straight for a telephone.” Any phenomenon that seizes the nation’s attention this much needs a name headline writers make sure of that. But it is hard to talk about the national Black Lives Matter movement without imparting a false sense of institutional coherence to it. Still, this movement, as diffuse and protean as it may seem, has mounted some of the most potent civil rights activism since the ’60s.
-Erika

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On the Genius of Infants: Are We Really Born Racist?
psychologytoday.com

On the Genius of Infants: Are We Really Born Racist?

Author Dr.Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton explains his findings on a study researching are people really born racist? Dr. Mendoza does studies on infants and their ability to identify races. The infants don’t show any remarks or difference according to race or skin color. Dr.Mendoza says “, one thing that seems clear is that, even in the first six months of life, babies are aware of general patterns in their social environment, including, perhaps, the common features that their caretakers share. “ this shows rather that we are not born racist but we learn from our environment. This article tells also how parents teach children about race. Even if the parents aren’t racist they don’t directly address it and this can make children feel awkward about the subject. Dr. Mendoza’s studies helps us grasp race and help us understand how it is taught through our environment not a natural born straight.
-Curtis

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Research-Based Advice on Teaching Children Not to Be Racist
theatlantic.com

Research-Based Advice on Teaching Children Not to Be Racist

This article talks about how Parents often shush their children when it comes to race which may put their parents at ease "Broaching that topic often feels inappropriate, irrelevant, or just plain uncomfortable”but in actuality it cause anxiety and depression and contrary to what you might believe babies and infants automatically disguised differences in people weather it be color or facial features which is why teaching your children about race from an early age is the right thing to do.
-Chad

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What is Systemic Racism?
raceforward.org

What is Systemic Racism?

This source is 8 short videos that explain how systemic racism occurs in our society and what systemic racism is. The videos tackle 5 subsections in the system in wealth gaps, employment, and housing issues all the way to problems such as government surveillance and incarceration problems. The producer Kat Lazo and the fautured actor Jay Smooth construted these PSA’s to educted the public of these problems. The article gives compelling statistics such as “ if you just apply for a job with a white sounding name, you're 50% more likely to get a callback than with a Black sounding name. “ and then is further explained in the video. These links provide a reliable website that is interesting and provides good facts about racial injustice.
-Curtis

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She didn’t laugh at racist jokes. Her coach said she didn’t have the right ‘chemistry’ for
washingtonpost.com

She didn’t laugh at racist jokes. Her coach said she didn’t have the right ‘chemistry’ for

Jasmine Orsted is a high school basketball player whose team would make racist jokes towards her. Own player claimed to say she “never had to worry about having an odd name because she wasn’t in the ghetto” according to Orsted. The coach even barred her from trying out because she “lacked chemistry.” This shows that race can matter to kids in school to this day. Unfortunately it appears that racism is still present.
-Haley

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Hate Is 'Alive Every Single Day,' LeBron James Says After Racist Graffiti Incident
npr.org

Hate Is 'Alive Every Single Day,' LeBron James Says After Racist Graffiti Incident

LeBron James Responds to Racial Vandalism: ‘Being Black in America Is Tough’ I believe this is relatable to, “Black Like Me,” because he talks about how it is to live in America being black, and in the book, John is in the same situation, especially with the black people being near the whites. How everything is separated. “No matter how much money you have, no matter how famous you are, no matter how many people admire you, being black in America is — it’s tough,” James said. “And we got a long way to go for us as a society and for us as African-Americans until we feel equal in America.”
-Erika

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A Concise History Of Black-White Relations In The United States - Everyday Feminism
everydayfeminism.com

A Concise History Of Black-White Relations In The United States - Everyday Feminism

This image is the most interesting because it shows racism at dept. In this image it shows a white man, using a black man to climb to the top of a shelf. This shelf is used to describe the white man, as rising to the top and becoming successful and all knowing. He claims that he is no longer racist and he believes everybody has equal opportunities. But when the black man asks for some help, the white man claims that he can not help him and he’ll have to figure it out on his own. He believes that he cannot help the black man because he did it on his own but doesn't even realize that he had help.
-Julia

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Appreciate the History of Names to Root out Stigma
nytimes.com

Appreciate the History of Names to Root out Stigma

This article is about people with African American based names, such as Da’Quan, are 50% less likely to get hired for a job. A study in 2005 also showed that teachers had lower expectations for students with unusually spelled names. To me it was very interesting and shows how we really do “judge a book by it’s cover.” A study in 2005 showed that teachers expected more from students with “less black-sounding names.” It doesn’t seem to be very fair to not let someone have a job based or expect someone to do poorly in their education just based on their name. This shows how race matters today, because people are simply judging people based on their names and their skin color.
-Haley

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10 TED classroom resources about race in America
blog.ed.ted.com

10 TED classroom resources about race in America

The Tale of two americans and the mini mart where they collided this ted talk tells a story about how a clerk at a mini mart in texas in the early 2000s fell victim to a hate crime as a result of the 2001 september 11 attacks receiving a gunshot wound to the face and receiving little to no help from first responders . This story is relevant to our story because it shows who some people just hate other because of their appearance, because this guy was muslim he was a target for hate crimes similar to african americans as we learn in the story “black like me”.
-Chad

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