Create Content in Minutes

Get Started For Free

Civil Rights Era

By Cassidy Joslin

Civil Rights Movement Outcome (Focus on Image)

Civil Rights Movement Outcome (Focus on Image)

1. In this visual image, there are 2 black men surrounding a white man holding hands. The Civil Rights Movement created this bond between these three men and through millions of other white and black citizens. Because of the protest, bonds like these have been merged and cause others to get to know one another, and not judge them by the color their skin is. This picture is so powerful for so many significant reasons. One because something that nobody ever thought could occur did; the relationship between a black and white person. Blacks were so incredibly mistreated by almost all whites, because of their reputation that was created before some were even born. Innocent newborn babies during the time when blacks were treated like the 'other,' were already hated on before they could even form a reputation for themselves. However, white children were coming into this world with a beautiful reputation, but why couldn't that be the same for young black children? Because of this movement, laws were adjusted and black children received the reputation they deserved. This movement altered so many people's opinions on racial concepts and finally made blacks feel at least somewhat welcome when they stepped onto a social platform or area where most white people typically hang out. Whites were no longer labeled as superior to blacks, and although some people might have still contained some discrimination in them, they kept those thoughts consumed in their minds because the rest of society no longer thought that way. It would've been rude if they said it out loud and the person most likely would've been judged. Although our world today still isn't completely perfect, if this movement hadn't happened, who knows how cruel people still may be. As a young white girl, seeing people in Cohasset Middle School of the opposing skin color receiving racial comments would be absolutely terrible but thanks to the Civil Rights Movement, our generation thankfully is thriving by creating equality in any public setting.
2. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, there isn't any movement that suddenly changed the prejudice citizens of Maycomb County, but the little risks some people were taking were making little steps to achieve the goal of equality. As Atticus Finch participated in a case that involved him defending a black man, it created a step closer to equality. As Dolphus Raymond was generally proud of having black children, it created a step closer to equality. Again, as Atticus Finch hires a black woman as a maid, it creates a step closer to equality. All of these things that seem very little are actually big steps to making the town a fair place to all citizens living in it.

racked.com
"Can't Turn Me 'Round" (Civil Rights Song)

"Can't Turn Me 'Round" (Civil Rights Song)

1. In the song, "Can't Turn Me 'Round" performed by The Roots, it shows about how while black people were protesting in the Civil Rights Movement, nobody was going to stop them and they weren't going to give up until laws changed. It exemplifies there determination and devotion to not be treated like the 'other' ever again. The lyrics of the song allow the listener to feel engaged in the song and can cause them to be empathetic with the poorly treated citizens. They can imagine if they were one of the black people, fighting for equality with everything they have because for so long they've felt like they were the outcasts of society, and the listener can really get a good sense of what they were going through this song. One of the best parts of the song is when the Roots sing, "I can't let segregation, turn me round, turn me round, turn me round, ain't gonna let segregation, turn me round, I'm gonna keep on a-walkin', keep on a-talkin', marching on to freedom land" (The Roots 1). No matter what they have to accomplish, they are going to achieve their goals of adjusting the laws of segregation, always feeling unwelcome, and most importantly, they are going to achieve their goals of adjusting EQUALITY in general. Something many people admire including myself, is the determination put towards the march and how nothing violent is incorporated into this act of protest. In the end, this protest DID alter the unacceptable laws and just the way they made that happen was incredible. No weapons or violent actions were involved and it indicated that black people deserve to be respected not disowned. Involving nothing brutal was very smart and allowed the black citizens to gain more respect when the rules changed. In our modern day society, blacks are far more appreciated honored as individuals. Some people are definitely still a bit prejudice, but as a whole, people are working to make the world equal with protests like Black Lives Matter, and social media movements that prove making somebody feel like the other just because of their color of their skin is something that our world shouldn't be focused and worrying about. There are so many other issues in this world that need to be addressed, and the discrimination over one's skin shouldn't be one of them.
2. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, almost the entire town of Maycomb consists of racial remarks, and acts of discrimination. There are few people that disagree with how racist everybody is, and they try to prove blacks are just like everyone else. Atticus Finch, a father of 2 children, has a black maid named Calpurnia that is basically a mother to Scout and Jem. People think it's peculiar that Atticus has a maid that is black, but he doesn't assign someone a job because of their skin color, he hires someone based off their general personality and work ethic. Atticus is a very honorable citizen of Maycomb County for all that he does for making the town at least try and allow blacks to feel welcome.

youtube.com
American civil rights movement | Definition, Events, History, & Facts

American civil rights movement | Definition, Events, History, & Facts

1. As the last article focuses more on the discrimination on black people, the Britannica article, American Civil Rights Movement written by Clayborne Carson demonstrates the rebound off of the prejudice remarks and hateful occurrences happening each day, and how one can feel they aren't the other. During the 1950's, black citizens and even some white had just about had enough of the segregation and disrespect. They started a movement, a happening that changed America greatly and showed people that one's skin color is no reason to discriminate because, in the end, we're all just humans. As the article discusses what changed because of this movement it says, "...the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s broke the pattern of public facilities’ being segregated by “race” in the South and achieved the most important breakthrough in equal-rights legislation for African Americans since the Reconstruction period" (Carson 1). Great alterations were made because of this effort to stop segregation, and America would most definitely not be the same without this movement. Our world could still consist of the concept of white people being superior to blacks. A magnificent thing about this movement is that people simply protested in non-violent ways. When the article states these non-violent ways of protesting it says, "African Americans and other subordinated groups mainly used nonviolent means—protests, legal challenges, pleas and petitions addressed to government officials, as well as sustained and massive civil rights movements—to achieve gradual improvements in their status" (1). The best parts about these non-violent ways of protest are it shows the world things can be accomplished by using one's knowledge and determination, not always by fighting with one's fists.
2. This connects to the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee because of the father in the novel, Atticus Finch. He illustrates what speaking up for what's right in a nutshell. Living in a town with continuous intolerance and unfairness, there are few people that are courageous enough to project their opinion, with no fear of what might arise. Atticus Finch, a defense attorney, shares his perspective on equality through a case. He defends a black man that has been accused of raping a white girl and is putting his respect others have for him on the line to prove this man is innocent. People like Atticus are how this Civil Rights Movement started, and each projection of one's voice is a step to make our world a better place, especially with making people feel like they aren't the other.

britannica.com
Civil Rights Movement - Black History - HISTORY.com

Civil Rights Movement - Black History - HISTORY.com

1. The civil rights movement exemplifies the concept of otherness because the article illustrates how blacks were treated extremely unfairly and unequally when it comes to little things like where one sits on the bus, and where one uses the bathroom. Black people were treated like the other during this entire part of history until they proudly stood up for there race which is very admirable. As the article describes the segregation of black people it says, "Blacks couldn’t use the same public facilities as whites, live in many of the same towns or go to the same schools. Interracial marriage was illegal, and most blacks couldn’t vote because they were unable to pass voter literacy tests"(Civil 1). Black citizens were so isolated from society and restricted to the typical activities white people complete each and every day. They were labeled as the 'other' in everything black people did. Every event they attended people disrespected them, judged them, and surely gave them nasty looks. This disrespect is also exemplified in the article that says, "Black men and women served heroically in World War II, despite suffering segregation and discrimination during their deployment. Yet many were met with prejudice and scorn upon returning home"(1). Even military veterans that were black were being dishonored even though they fought for those cruel. These occurrences happened all throughout the 1950's and 60's and were worst in the southern states of the United States of America. Eventually, the protesting of black people became stronger and stronger and concluded the Civil Rights Era, creating equality between all races.
2. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, discrimination, acts of prejudice, and generally making blacks feel like the other was found on every page. Important people like Rosa Parks that stood up to people discriminating are shown in To Kill a Mockingbird, and that significant other is Mr. Atticus Finch. He defends a black man that was falsely accused of raping a white girl. The town of Maycomb county is well aware Tom is innocent because of Atticus's exceptional amount of evidence and facts provided, but because the town is genuinely so extremely prejudice, Tom is thrown in jail anyway. It is people like Atticus that need to be far more appreciated. However, Atticus isn't noticed more because the mindset of the town is that black people will always be the other. White people have different churches, schools, neighborhoods, and even if a black enters a store more well known to whites, they are immediately neglected and stared at, thus causing black people of Maycomb to feel like the other all the time.

history.com