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Asperger's, not what you think it is | Krister Palo | TEDxYouth@ISH

Asperger's, not what you think it is | Krister Palo | TEDxYouth@ISH

Krister Palo is a 15-year-old student at the International School of The Hague who just happens to have Asperger's syndrome. In his talk, he shares misconceptions about people with Asperger syndrome and focuses on breaking down popular stereotypes and assumption such as their inability to want to participate on society. This video conveys the danger of stereotyping as you become limited and only see the world in one way. It also express that by having stigmas and stereotypes around people with disabilities it excludes them from the rest of society. It shows that because of limited thinking and preconceived knowledge such as because this person doesn’t appear to want to join in on something, we should just not let him. These thoughts make it seem that people with disabilities don’t want to join society as they have been ‘boxed’ into one category that seem to be the determining factor in who they are. The message taken from this is we have to abolish these stereotypes in order to expand our horizons and to be kind and accepting of one another. This is seen in curious incident as people have misunderstood Christopher and excluded him, misinterpreted his disability and lack of social skills and turned this into a judgement of his intelligence. By categorising Christopher this way it had detrimental effects. By not stereotyping and accepting one another things could have turned out turned out different for Christopher and we would live in much more accepting and kind society.

youtube.com
The Hidden Potential of Autistic Kids

The Hidden Potential of Autistic Kids

This article talk about how intelligence test might be overlooking when it comes to autism. The articles talk about how people are under estimating what autistic people are capable of contributing to society. Diagnostic test are only focusing on what autistic people cannot do, rather than what they can do. Autistic people struggle with intelligence test as they are easily distracted by sensory information and have limited language capabilities. It shows how Autistic testing play into their weakness as the most commonly administered test is completely verbal, timed test that relies heavily on cultural and social knowledge which are all aspects that people with disabilities have. This can be seen in a little boy who took the test. One of the questions were You find out someone is getting married. What is an appropriate question to ask them? “The boys answer: "What kind of cake are you having? “The proctor shook her head. No, she said, that's not a correct answer. Try again and he said, "I don't have another question. That's what I would ask." This shows how theses test unfairly treat and rank Autistic kids. It validates to society that they are dumb and not capable of participating in it. To fix this we need to recognize talents with in people instead of isolating them by only focusing on what they can’t do. These illiterates to us all that we cannot overlook people potentials but to know that everyone has a different way of learning. Everyone needs to be accepting of people differences. It demonstrates to us all that testing could miss out lots of hidden talents detrimental people lives. We need to realize the power with in people (autistic minds) and not be stuck with in their limitations. This can be seen in curious incident when Christopher while still being labeled with learning difficulties is able to understand much more about math and physics then most of the population. He has hidden talents in that would help people in their research or jobs. With his diagnosis doesn’t focus on his love and ability for math’s and physics but rather what he can’t do and his behavioural issues. It is so important to not confine someone to a label or test but rather see into them and see what they are truly capable of.

scientificamerican.com
Comic Recreates Autism Spectrum

Comic Recreates Autism Spectrum

This comic strip completely redefined the autistic spectrum. Its aim is to bring understanding about stereotyping. It also explains the spectrum in a more accurate way. This comic strip explains how each and every autistic person is different, each with their own strength and weaknesses like everyone. It goes to show how confusing it is to a linear spectrum as it creates perception of autistic people as also being linear such as you are either not autistic, a little autistic or very autistic. It creates phrase such as you’re autistic then I thought which has detrimental effect to people. These saying create negative stereotyping in society which limit autistic peoples free will and opportunities. To fix this the author has suggested a complete new spectrum. One that is round and has different categories and you place your self either closer or further away from the center to what degree you find each component difficult. This way gets rid of the stereotyping that every autistic person struggles with the same things and also highlights that they have strengths. It replaces old stereotypes and creates a much more detailed way of explain people’s traits and processing information. This can be seen incurious incident when Christopher is explained has high functioning autism yet this doesn’t explain anything, it just says that he has a form of disability. People have categorised him from this and this means stereotypes have already ben preconceived for him. it is important to break free from stereotypes to become more accepting and understanding

youtube.com
The Benefits of Asperger’s Syndrome | Your Little Professor

The Benefits of Asperger’s Syndrome | Your Little Professor

This articles talk about this advantages and specialness of having Asperger’s. It demonstrates successful people who have Asperger’s and thrived in society by creating new invention, companies and methodologies’. This can have been seen through Bill Gates, Albert Einstein and many more. People with Asperger’s are able to to create a world for themselves in which they are able to rethink ideas and creations with originality as to create new ways with all abilities channeled into the one specialty. They see the world differently to other people and this means that they can come up with new solution to problems other overlook. This demonstrates the wrong stereotyping of people with Asperger’s being incapable and not intelligent but shows that they are intellectual and their quirks make them special and amazing. It conveys the idea that they are humans with talents and the abilities to better and help the world. This can have been seen in curios incident where Christopher is only able to understand things that are logical and in turn math and science. He has focused his energy into that therefore has excelled. He is shown in have the capabilities and intelligence above most for this area of interest. This conveys to us how special Christopher is as a character from all his quirks and the way he perceives the world a little different from us.

yourlittleprofessor.com
Boy, 10, with autism touches the hearts of thousands with moving poem

Boy, 10, with autism touches the hearts of thousands with moving poem

This poem was created by 10-year-old Benjamin who has Asperger’s. When he his fifth-grade teacher asked her students to write a poem about themselves, beginning every few sentences with "I am." Benjamin couldn't wait to start writing, so he sat down at the kitchen table and didn't look up until he was finished. This poem deals with the topic of being different. It expresses to us that being different is a part of everyone but being judged and discriminated by these differences makes people feel isolated and mistreated. This poem illustrates to us that diversity is to be accepted and that everyone should embrace their oddness. It makes us realized that once Benjamin understood that he's was odd he could explore that so is everyone else in their own way which should be embraced and celebrated as every single person is special. This can be related to Christopher in curious incident as this poem reflects how Christopher feels towards himself and the world. Christopher acknowledges and accepts his diffrence which makes him special yet yearns to understand people. He recognizes that everyone is different and should embrace this about themselves. his poem encourages people to understand the ‘ oddness’ displayed when having Asperger and educating people to evoke understanding and consideration.


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dailymail.co.uk
Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

This video follows 16 year old Rosie kind. She is autistic but that doesn’t matter. she talks about how how we need to break common stereotypes and stop striving for ‘normal'. She goes to explain that common stereotypes of people with autism such as liking math and science but nothing else or that everyone is a savant but refuses these exploring her own personal stories on how she doesn’t mold to this. These stories include having a completely different and creative outlook on life then other with her same disability. This demonstrates to us that we as society put people into boxes. We give them a category and label and expect them to stick to it. It expresses to the injustices we have by giving people in to stereotypes. It limits peoples creativity and ability to form their own identity. She later goes on to talk about how everyone want to strive for normal. She expresses to us what is amazing about being normal and explains that we wouldn’t want to be called normal as a compliment but rather extraordinary or special. The want for society to fit into this idea of normal creates a fear to be different. It means that people are afraid of variety and want everyone to be just like them ‘ normal’. If people think this way then this leads to discrimination against people who are different such as disabled people and also forces people to conform to social norms. It is so important to accept who we are our who selves and Rosie explain this. She finishes by explain that we need to celebrate uniqueness and cheer every time unleashes there imagination.

ted.com
Asperger’s: Not Being Afraid Anymore | Richard Coffey | TEDxChathamKent

Asperger’s: Not Being Afraid Anymore | Richard Coffey | TEDxChathamKent

This speech talks about being afraid to share and talk about differences in fear of isolation and discrimination. It follows Richard Coffey is a Grade 12 high-school student from Toronto. When he was 4 years old, Richard was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, a form of high-functioning autism. Richard struggles with understanding how to make social connections and explains what it’s like to navigate high school with Asperger’s syndrome. He explains this through the analogy of his high school life felt like the first day of high school on repeat. This in the terms of on the first day of school nobody looks out of the ordinary just excited but on the inside they are are terrified. They don’t really know how to start up a conversation, or who to talk to or what to say. He then goes on to explain that he hid his Asperger syndrome from everyone and kept up the façade of not struggling with social interaction in fear of being labeled an outcast. This shows the problem of having to have two different side yourself and to only show people one. To have your true self hidden in fear of rejection in society. This illustrates to us that high school environment does not accept people who are different. This detrimental effects on individual expressing themselves. It demonstrates that by not letting people express them true selves they end up feeling alone and ashamed playing a big role in their self-esteem levels. Richard then talk about how he overcome hiding his differences and the best way to learn about Asperger’s and autism is to simply be not afraid to talk about it. He applies this to all differences as well. This bring forward the message of by taking time to understand someone, to express interest in someone is helping them accept themselves and increase everyone’s understanding about certain issues. Is it so important to guide and help people in order for them to feel comfortable and wanted and therefore not afraid to hide their differences from people.

youtube.com
Half of autistic adults 'abused by someone they trusted as a friend'

Half of autistic adults 'abused by someone they trusted as a friend'

This articles talk about how people with autism experience cruelty and unkindness. This article explain how most of this mistreatment and cruelty stems from lack of education about people with autism. This leaves people with autism misunderstood and without any support from the government and society. This article is really shocking with statistics such as 49% of the 1300 people surveyed reported having been abused by someone they thought of as a friend. This articles brings forwards the problems faced by people with autism and urges people to feel obliged and responsible to educate themselves about autism. This articles outlines how people with autism find it difficult to pick up on social cues and as a result mistrust and misjudge people which leaves them in position to be taken advantage of. The solution to this problem is to have increased government plans for care systems and social services. It means educating the public on autism so people can be accepting and understanding so that we are able to listen, to understand, to treat right people so that they can blossom and be accepted into society. The theme of mistreat and taking advantage can be seen in curious s indecent. Christopher is again and again misunderstood. He is mistreated from the police officer because the police officer doesn’t understand him. He is taken advantage over by his dad because his dad has manipulated him. we don’t usually consider the effects of labeling someone as weak and useless by do this to autistic kids it opens them up to manipulation and cruelty. By not education we are allowing this treatment to continue therefore it seem to be imperative to educate in order for people to accept and understand.

theguardian.com