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Curation Project: Being "Othered"

Cinder

Cinder

1. The book Cinder is about a girl named Cinder who is a cyborg. In the book’s universe, cyborgs are othered by the normal citizens. Cinder’s stepmother, Adri, does not like cyborgs much. “‘It will be a miracle if you can find something to wear that will hide your’- her gaze dropped to Cinder’s boots- ‘eccentricities’” (Meyer 25). This quote shows Cinder being othered by her stepmother because Adri is saying that CInder needs to hide her cyborg parts or she’ll embarrass Adri (which is something Adri is always worried about). In the book, the Prince, Kai, asks Cinder to go to the ball with him. She says no, and her reasoning is that “the whole world would know that the prince had taken a cyborg to his coronation ball. He would be mortified” (Meyer 190). This quote shows Cinder being othered by herself, saying that since she is a cyborg she can’t go to a ball with a human, and she knows that the whole world would not approve of her going with the prince because of her cyborg status.
2. To Kill a Mockingbird connects to this because of how Tom Robinson reacts to being convicted. He others himself because he is black, and attempts to escape of prison because he knows he will be killed, even if he is innocent. “‘They shot him,’ said Atticus. ‘He was running. It was during their exercise period. They said he just broke into a blind raving charge at the fence and started climbing over” (Lee 315).

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Colored Girl With a Sign

Colored Girl With a Sign

1. This photo shows a colored girl holding a sign that reads “No, my family did not have to flee the Sudan… sorry I don’t have a more ‘exotic’ African story.” This is an example of being othered because this girl was, at some point, asked if her family had to flee Sudan, just because she is black. This is incredibly stereotypical.
2. As said on my paragraphs on The Guardian article, To Kill a Mockingbird is full of racial stereotypes. For example, Scout asks Calpurnia, “why do you talk n*****-talk to the- your folks when you know it’s not right?” and Calpurnia responds with “Well, in the first place I’m black-” (Lee 167). This is a stereotype that all black people talk the same way, and even Calpurnia, who is black, supports this stereotype.

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Oxford's 'students of colour' on being 'othered' at university

Oxford's 'students of colour' on being 'othered' at university

1. This piece exemplifies “the other” because it shows how colored students at Oxford are being othered, or prejudiced against. It is mostly pictures, but still gets the point across of colored students being othered. According to the article, colored students at Oxford have encountered people with attitudes like: "How did you get in to Oxford? Jamaicans don't study;" "Oh, you're from Ghana ... My cousin's nanny is from Kenya.” These are some obvious stereotypes shown in these quotes, such as “Jamaicans aren’t smart” (which is not true) and “All African countries are pretty much the same” (also not true). A photo I thought was interesting on the site showed a colored girl holding a sign that read, “Yes, I am an international student… from Canada!”
2. This connects to To Kill a Mockingbird because there are a lot of racial stereotypes in it. One of them is “that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women” (Lee 273). Of course, this stereotype is not true. But this quote connects with the article because it shows a stereotype, which is what the article is mainly about.

theguardian.com
Being ‘Othered’ – SWAHA International

Being ‘Othered’ – SWAHA International

1. This piece exemplifies “the other” because it is explaining how people being othered is affecting our society today. The paragraph reads, “Our ancestors were ‘othered,’ but they stood strong; now we are ‘othering’ ourselves.” This shows how when people in the past were othered, they continued on, but we are now doing the same things. The article says the othering’s “extreme effects can easily be found in recent history – Hitler and the Jews or the Hutus and the Tutsis in the Rwandan genocide.” This is a good example of othering in history, and even if our society thinks we are over it, we’re not.
2. To Kill a Mockingbird shows lots of example of people being othered, such as when Jem tells Scout that their Aunty wants her to be more of a lady and asks, “Can’t you take up sewing or something?” (Lee 302). This is an example of Scout being othered, because she is a tomboy in a time period where that is unacceptable.

swahainternational.org