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Current Research about TV vs Fahrenheit 451

Is Ray Bradbury and this video about watching too much tv trying to convey the same message?

What happens to your body when you binge-watch too much TV?

What happens to your body when you binge-watch too much TV?

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and the Business Insider video “What happens to your body when you binge-watch too much TV” both warn about the negative effects of excessive TV watching on relationships and sleep. In Fahrenheit 451 society is under the impression that everything is fine and dandy because their media use is limited to TV and strictly filtered books that don’t make them think too deeply about anything. Additionally, many in society are obsessed with TV. Montag’s wife is described as having an “unsleeping mind” and has to take sleeping pills to get through the night. Later it is revealed she is obsessed with television when she asks her husband for a “fourth wall” of TV so that the room wouldn’t be theirs anymore but all kinds of “exotic” peoples’ rooms. Bradbury purposely reveals these details about Montag’s wife, Mildred, because it clearly shows the negative effects that screens and constantly being plugged in has on her. Not only does she hardly sleep, but she also values the exotic world of TV more than spending time with her real-life husband. In Business Insider’s video “What happens to your body when you binge-watch too much TV” it describes how sitting in front of a TV for hours (like Mildred does) “make[s] it harder to sleep [at] night”. It also informs that too much TV can affect how “committed you are to your real relationship”. These effects are strikingly similar to the ones Mildred experiences in Fahrenheit 451. Both Ray Bradbury and Business Insider have the same purpose in mind; they want to convince their audience of the negative impacts that screens can have if excessively used. In today’s world screens surround us constantly and these two pieces of media encourage the audience to look around at the real world and think deeper about their real issues such as their health and their relationships with others.

businessinsider.com