Create Content in Minutes

Get Started For Free

Equlity from 1900-1949

By: Emily Brownell

1. 19th Amendment - Women’s History - HISTORY.com

1. 19th Amendment - Women’s History - HISTORY.com

The 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote. This Amendment took place on august 18th, 1920. After tirelessly working to enforce this amendment, congress gave in.

A) The most impacted reason is that women can now vote legally. This was a big step towards equality as well.

B) This is very important to me. I see this as women now have voice and chose over what can happen to the U.S.

C) This is lets women vote and its still enforced today. Not like it would ever not be enforced, just that it hasn't even been 100 years since this amendment was enforced.

history.com
2. History At a Glance: Women in World War II | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans

2. History At a Glance: Women in World War II | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans

American women played important roles during World War II, both at home and in uniform. This movement was called 'The riveter movement.' There was no one named Rosie the riveter, she was an icon for feminists replacing the jobs of men while they were off at war.

A) This is icon is still used within the feminist world today. This even/idea is crucial to our history.

B) This is the early beginnings of feminism, almost like modern feminist moments that we have around today.

C) This is still talked about today, outside of history classrooms. Its used in the real world.

nationalww2museum.org
3. Women's suffrage - Wikipedia

3. Women's suffrage - Wikipedia

It was not only America that had issues with equality, it was everyone around the world! we still have issues to this day.

A) Even though some things were before 1900, it would still be important to put these on here. This is how our world was shaped today.

B) This impacts me because most women over the world are able to vote and that is important to me.

C) These acts are still in place today.

en.wikipedia.org
4. Alice Stebbins Wells - Wikipedia

4. Alice Stebbins Wells - Wikipedia

Alice Stebbins Wells was the first American-Born female law enforcer. She hired in 1910 to the Los Angeles Police Department, Served for 30 years. When she was hired, she was a Sworn police officer. Then in 1934, she was ranked as a Sargent.

A) She is the beginning of having women treated equally, on a legal level.

B) This gave me an idea on how it was back then and how different things are. I couldn't imagine how disrespected she was. Not only by citizens, but co-workers. She was brave.

C) Now we hire men and women on the law force with out paying attention to their gender. This was the beginning of how things are today.

en.wikipedia.org
5. 14th Amendment

5. 14th Amendment

Amendment XIVSection 1.All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside.
A) This is how we let EVERYONE vote. Still in use, so its a pretty important event
B) You see, I'm all for equality and this was one of the earliest ways that were achieved.
C) America still uses this to this day and its still enforced pretty well.

law.cornell.edu
6. Representation of the People Act 1918 - Wikipedia

6. Representation of the People Act 1918 - Wikipedia

This Act was about introducing the equal rights to men and women in Europe.
A) This is important because this is where America got some of its ideas from
B) This shows me how the world was back then and over in Europe.
C) These acts are still in use today.

en.wikipedia.org
7. The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom. 1900-1936

7. The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom. 1900-1936

As segregation tightened and racial oppression escalated across the U.S., black leaders joined white reformers to form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).
A) Again, Some of the beginning acts of equality.
B) This is important to me because how some people were treated because of their race makes me very angry and this was to stop how those things were changed.
C) We still refer to this nowadays and it has a huge impact on equality today.

loc.gov
8. Margaret Sanger - Wikipedia

8. Margaret Sanger - Wikipedia

Margaret Higgins Sanger was an American birth control activist, sex educator, writer, and nurse. I feel like she is an important part of out history.

A) Shaped how our world is today, with medicine and planned parenthood

B) She invented birth control and saved many peoples lifes from un-planned pregnancy.

C) People still use birth control to this day, so there is still an impact today.

en.wikipedia.org
9. Maud Pember Reeves - Wikipedia

9. Maud Pember Reeves - Wikipedia

Maud Pember Reeves was a Feminist and poet born in Australia who married a journalist and politician. Maud became interested in the idea of expressing your thoughts through the English literature.

A) Her poem about inequality gave the world insight on the whole idea of poverty and how it could be changed if women could work.

B) It shows me how much females used to struggle and how lucky I am to be living in the world we have now.

C) Feminist now write poems and books on things that need to be changed and how we could fix them or how things would be different if things were like how they said.

en.wikipedia.org
10. Mother's Day (United States) - Wikipedia

10. Mother's Day (United States) - Wikipedia

Anna Jarvis recognized this holiday after she saw how unfair it was because of fathers day.

A) We have a holiday to match fathers day now.

B) This is a day where I can show my mom that I appreciate her.

C) We still celebrate this holiday today.

en.wikipedia.org