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Examples of Animal Behaviors

Laurel Clark

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Teach Young How to Migrate

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Teach Young How to Migrate

This is an example of migration behavior and learned behavior in whooping cranes. Research has now been released showing that when even one older crane (5-7 years old) flies with a group of younger cranes (1 year old), the flying pack is significantly more successful at non deviating from the most efficient path. After the crane's first migration, they younger cranes are better at flying on the same path, showing that older cranes train younger cranes in both how they are adept at maneuvering around weather as well as what the most efficient path is.

news.nationalgeographic.com
Ravens and Intelligence

Ravens and Intelligence

This is an example of problem solving behavior in Ravens. Ravens are well known to be surprisingly intelligent and witty despite their small brains. In this experiment, individual Ravens were tested to see if they could devise a plan to retrieve a piece of meat hanging from a branch by a thin piece of rope. The birds were able to quickly learn how to loop the rope and hold it with their claws in order to bring the meat to them, thus showing their intelligence and problem solving skills.

video.nationalgeographic.com
Marine Animals Keep Time With Multiple Clocks

Marine Animals Keep Time With Multiple Clocks

This is an example of behavioral rhythms in certain marine animals and crustaceans. Evidence has been found that species such as the ragworm and the marine relative of the pillbug can keep time with clocks based on phases of the moon or tides using circalunar or circatidal clocks that control mating or feeding behavior. In some species these clocks may affect each other while in others they can be completely separate.

news.nationalgeographic.com
Elephant Seals Recognize Their Rivals’ Voices—Hear Their Calls

Elephant Seals Recognize Their Rivals’ Voices—Hear Their Calls

This is an example of social behavior in Elephant Seals. Male elephant seals learn, remember, and understand the vocal rhythms of other male seals voices and use this information to make social decisions. When beta males hear the call of an alpha male or more dominant beta male they flee in fear.

news.nationalgeographic.com