Create Content in Minutes

Get Started For Free

How can a teacher-librarian facilitate inquiry learning?

During the re-search activity I created a topic page devoted to inquiry learning and how a teacher-librarian may facilitate this in school.

Teacher librarians' understandings of inquiry learning

Teacher librarians' understandings of inquiry learning

This journal article by Mandy Lupton discusses the teacher-librarian and how the role is increasingly about providing support to teachers and classes with inquiry learning in the Australian Curriculum. The article addresses how the teacher-librarian role has evolved over time. A study was conducted with nine teacher-librarians from Queensland schools ranging from K-12, to understand how teacher librarians understood inquiry learning and their practices. What I found helpful was the transcripts and interviews relating to teacher-librarians success and barriers. This directly relates to my topic question and assists in giving me insight and validation with what other teacher-librarians are doing and what their successes and barriers have been. Note: authentication is required to view the article as it sits behind a database paywall.

ezpauth.library.qut.edu.au
Student Learning in the Library: What Library Power Librarians Say

Student Learning in the Library: What Library Power Librarians Say

This study by Carol Collier Kuhlthau examines what good learning experiences look like with three case study schools over three years, after their involvement in the Library Power initiative. The study revealed libraries that embraced an inquiry approach were more effective. Schools that viewed the library as essential and were committed to the inquiry process saw the best results for students learning. This reinforces to me the need for libraries and teacher-librarians to become involved with teachers and have classes participate in the inquiry process. The study also highlighted the need for collaboration between teachers and teacher-librarians to provide these opportunities for students.

researchgate.net
Three in one: teacher, information specialist, leader

Three in one: teacher, information specialist, leader

This journal article by Alinda Sheerman explains the vital role the teacher-librarian plays in facilitating inquiry learning. The article discusses processes undertaken by teachers and students at Broughton Anglican College in conjunction with the teacher-librarian. This directly relates to my topic question and highlights the important specialist skills a teacher-librarian has to offer. The article refers to relevant literature in the field, such as, Kuhlthau, Maniotes and Caspari. The article helped to bring me some understanding around how I need to be working with teachers and students and what the results of that learning should look like. Note: authentication is required to view the article as it sits behind a database paywall.

ezpauth.library.qut.edu.au
Librarian-Teacher Partnerships for Inquiry Learning

Librarian-Teacher Partnerships for Inquiry Learning

The study by Joyce Yukawa and Violet Harada offered some interesting insights into how a librarian working with the teacher could model inquiry learning and involve students in the process. This study consisted of 9 teams of librarians and teachers creating and implementing units of inquiry learning with K-12 students during a yearlong course. The study took a practice-based approach to professional development and I found the Figure on page 101 titled Practice-Based PD Model particularly insightful and relevant to my topic question. Feedback to monitor progress and learning outcomes was also a highlight for me. Seeing the questionnaire and 10 questions the study asked teachers and librarians to gage self-perceived gains in knowledge and ability is something I think I could do in the future when working with teachers who may be new to inquiry learning. This study provided some practical frameworks that a teacher-librarian can use to facilitate inquiry learning.

ejournals.library.ualberta.ca
Just Wondering - A blog by Kath Murdoch

Just Wondering - A blog by Kath Murdoch

This blog has been included for the relevant posts and information it offers teacher-librarians around being an ‘inquiry teacher’. The blog offers engaging insights and musing from another experienced teacher around integrating inquiry learning and helping students to ‘connect’ and ‘wonder’. The blog would be useful not only for teacher-librarians looking to facilitate inquiry learning but anyone interested in the process. This blog provides professional readings that are easy to connect with and relevant to implementing the process in the classroom. The blog also focused on the mindset you need as an ‘inquiry teacher’ which is particularly helpful if inquiry learning is a new process you are looking at incorporating in the classroom.

kathmurdoch.com.au
Statement on Guided Inquiry and the curriculum  :: ASLA

Statement on Guided Inquiry and the curriculum :: ASLA

This resource has been included as the Australian School Library Association (ASLA) is a national authority that is committed to high standards in the field of teacher librarianship and school library resource services. This is essential for any teacher librarian as it provides a comprehensive statement outlining the principles of Guided Inquiry. The statement emphasises the role the teacher librarian can have when implementing Guided Inquiry and refers to Kahlthau’s work on Guided Inquiry. This information is essential for any teacher librarian looking to facilitate Inquiry learning in their role at school. It advocates for the role of the teacher librarian in the process and assists in understanding the standards expected within that role.

asla.org.au
INQUIRY LEARNING & INFORMATION LITERACY ideas & musings from Mandy Lupton

INQUIRY LEARNING & INFORMATION LITERACY ideas & musings from Mandy Lupton

Mandy Lupton’s blog is an important part of this collection as it encompasses rich information about inquiry learning. The blog is presented in a scholarly way and posts are well referenced. Having a well-referenced blog that includes hyperlinks allows the reader to choose to seek out further information. Of particular interest to my question around how teacher-librarians can facilitate inquiry learning were the posts on Australian Curriculum and inquiry models. I found these posts informative and insightful as they directly relate to how I could incorporate inquiry learning in the classroom.

inquirylearningblog.wordpress.
Building Guided Inquiry Teams for the 21st Century learners.

Building Guided Inquiry Teams for the 21st Century learners.

This journal article explains the process of guided inquiry and how it addresses the learning needs for students in the 21st Century. The article discusses the importance of a team of teachers (such as teacher librarian, classroom teacher and technology teacher) working together to provide targeted learning experiences that foster deeper understanding through hands on learning. It suggests that the guided inquiry process fosters transferable skills that allow students to “learn how to learn”. The article also provides 3 case studies to highlight how the process works in both primary and high school settings. In my beginning questions I asked how I can use inquiry learning to support the teachers at my school, and this article highlights the possibilities with incorporating an inquiry team (supporting the need for a Teacher-Librarian) at a school level. The guided inquiry allows student centred learning with teacher support, as such I feel it provides the best of student centred learning and teacher directed learning as it has parts of both of these pedagogies. The idea of working in a team also strengthens the argument for teacher-librarian role to be available within the school environment.

reallifelearningcommittee.sasc
Inquiry Learning:  Journey through the thinking process

Inquiry Learning: Journey through the thinking process

This journal article provides the reader with a clear understanding of inquiry learning. The article states that inquiry is a natural process and in an instinctive search for understanding, we often work through the stages of inquiry. As such, schools need to provide a way to keep this interest and help students become conscious of this learning process. The article discusses the need for questions to lead inquiry rather than topics, and provides many practical suggestions for the approach to be successful in the learning environment. It advocates the use of student questioning to promote engagement, and challenges students to use skills for decision-making, planning and problem solving. This article provides a practical guide for improving the quality of inquiry learning in any topic area. It has strong arguments for advocating an inquiry approach to units of work, as well as questions to guide the teacher in the inquiry process.

richardsonps.act.edu.au
Developing teachers of Inquiry:  An emerging Humanities Model of Inquiry (HMI)

Developing teachers of Inquiry: An emerging Humanities Model of Inquiry (HMI)

This research paper discusses Inquiry learning through reflective observations of Pre-service teachers. It breaks down the 4 main Inquiry models used in primary education: Integrated Inquiry Approach, 5 Es, TELSTAR, and Action Research Model, and presents an overview for each model in a table. It points out that although the models have different elements they can be grouped into 4 main focus areas: “thinking about the topic, concept or content knowledge; structure for students articulation of queries and skills to undertake research; value of students sharing their work and outcomes of their research; knowledge should be acted upon as the work undertaken in the inquiry is valuable”. The end of the paper introduces a 5-stage model for Humanities studies: Exploration; Focused Investigation; Showcased Learning; Applied Knowledge, which offers connection between lifeworld learning and sustained inquiry. I found this paper to help me further understand that inquiry learning is not just a model to be followed but it is a way of learning and engaging which allows for deeper understanding, and allows for making connections with what students already know and as such values their prior knowledge.

dro.deakin.edu.au
Crap Detection, A 21st Century Literacy

Crap Detection, A 21st Century Literacy

The need for critical thinking or analysis is a 21st century literacy skill. I have included this is my collection as when I was looking at articles, journals, blogs or websites to include these were the questions I asked before its inclusion.

librariesandtransliteracy.word