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Eclipse Curation Project

This page explains the way solar eclipses work.

Where can you see it?
d3afou6e7ewigz.cloudfront.net

Where can you see it?

To see a total eclipse, where the moon fully covers the sun for a short few minutes, you must be in the line of totality. The line of totality is a relatively thin path, around 70 miles wide, that will cross the U.S. from West to East. The first point of contact will be at Oregon at 9:05 a.m. Totality begins there at 10:16 a.m. Over the next hour and a half, it will cross through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina. The total eclipse will end near Charleston, South Carolina at 2:48 p.m. From there the lunar shadow leaves the United States at 4:09. Its longest duration will be near Carbon-dale, Illinois, where the sun will be completely covered for two minutes and 40 seconds.

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why can you see it?
eclipse2017.nasa.gov

why can you see it?

a solar eclipse is in which the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, as viewed from a given location. For this eclipse, the longest period when the moon completely blocks the sun from any given location along the path will be about two minutes and 40 seconds. The last time the contiguous U.S. saw a total eclipse was in 1979.

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who can see it?
eclipse2017.nasa.gov

who can see it?

All of North America as well as parts of South America, Africa, and Europe can see the solar eclipse but only in America will it be a total eclipse.

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how can you see it?
eclipse2017.nasa.gov

how can you see it?

You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality. That could severely hurt your eyes. However, there are many ways to safely view an eclipse of the sun including direct viewing – which requires some type of filtering device and indirect viewing where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Both methods should produce clear images of the partial phase of an eclipse. We however unlike the paper will not take our glasses off due to the fact that we are not in the line of totality. Therefore the sun would not be completely covered and would hurt our eyes.

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