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Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Official Trailer – “Believe”

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Official Trailer – “Believe”

1. Private Doss, a pacifist, was assigned to basic training at Fort Jackson during World War Two. When the other soldiers at the base learned that he refused to shoot or even touch a gun, they beat him, shunned him, and tried to get him dishonorably discharged from the U.S. Army. They othered him because they thought he was a coward. When the time came for the War with the Japanese Army at Hacksaw Ridge, all of the soldiers retreated except for Private Doss, an army medic. He stayed on the Ridge alone and dragged seventy five injured soldiers to safety by himself. Before the battle, one of his commanding officers said to the troops, “Private Doss does not believe in violence. Do not look to him to save you on the battlefield.” (Hacksaw Ridge; 2016). This is an example of misjudging someone for their religious beliefs. If the other soldiers had learned more about his religion and had empathy for the situation Private Doss was in, they might have been more tolerant towards him. One soldier said to Private Doss, “I don’t think this is a question of religion, I think this is cowardice.” (Hacksaw Ridge; 2016) Private Doss was not a coward. Desmond Doss earned the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in 1946.

2. Boo Radley, a character in To Kill A Mockingbird, was also othered. He was psychologically challenged and isolated himself for others. The Maycomb community would gossip about him and how he stayed inside and never came out. Some people lead their children believe that he was dangerous and they should not go near his home. Neighborhood children ridiculed Arthur Radley, and played tricks on this reclusive man. Much like Desmond Doss, Arthur Radley also showed himself to be a hero at the end of the text when he saved Jem Finch from Bob Ewell. If only someone in Maycomb had reached out to the Radley family earlier with a compassionate word. An empathetic conversation with the Radley family during Arthur’s long period of isolation could have given Arthur Radley a very different life.

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CommonLit | Address to Congress on Women's Suffrage

CommonLit | Address to Congress on Women's Suffrage

1. Carrie Chapman Catt was the suffragette who spoke at the Address to Congress on Women’s Suffrage in 1917. She reported that “Woman suffrage is inevitable ... Three distinct causes made it inevitable. First, the history of our country. Ours is a nation borne of revolution, of rebellion against a system of government so securely entrenched in the customs and traditions of human society that in 1776 it seemed impregnable.” Secondly, some states are already allowing women to vote, so it is time to make it a national referendum. “Third, the leadership of the United States in world democracy compels the enfranchisement of its own women.” These strong arguments by Carrie Chapman Catt led to congress approving the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote on June 4,1919. Previous to the passing of the 19th amendment, women had been othered simply because of their gender.

2. During the same time period, Harper Lee was writing her book, To Kill a Mockingbird, about a fictional town named Maycomb, which struggled with prejudice against other societal issues. Black people, poor people, and mentally disabled people were othered by members of Maycomb’s community. There were many strong female characters in the novel. There was Aunt Alexandra, Miss Stephanie, Mrs. Dubose, and Miss Caroline. Ignorance towards genders was a prominent problem throughout the book as it was in a similar time frame.

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Newsela | Birth of the Civil Rights Movement, 1941-1954

Newsela | Birth of the Civil Rights Movement, 1941-1954

1. During the 1940’s, resistance to racial oppression in the South had escalated. Several black leaders encouraged marches for racial equality. “The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) began major attacks against discrimination and segregation.”(news ela). In 1933, President Roosevelt provided more federal support to African Americans than any other President. In 1948 the military was desegregated. This had a lot to do with the fact that black soldiers had fought so hard for America during the war. Social pressure “Led to a 1954 Supreme Court decision ending segregation in the country’s schools.” (news ela). This article chronicles political gains for the black community in the twenty years following the publication of the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, which primarily dealt with othering due to racial prejudice.

2. When reading To Kill a Mockingbird, the tension between blacks and whites was very prominent. It wasn’t just white people who didn’t trust black people; the black people didn’t welcome the white people into their neighborhood either. Calpurnia, the Finch’s cook could not bring the Finch children to her church without much dissension by other black people in the church. A woman said: “I want to know why you bringin’ white children to n***** church.” (122). It was very obvious in the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, that social injustices between the races was a huge issue that caused much friction in the Maycomb community.

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CommonLit | That Evening Sun

CommonLit | That Evening Sun

1. That Evening Sun, by William Faulkner, written in 1931; is focused on a black woman, Nancy, who’s afraid to leave the white family she works for during the day because her husband says he will kill her if she is alone in house with him. The family she works for, (the father and three children) are at first empathetic towards her, walking her home in the dark, allowing her to sleep in the children’s room, etc. The family had been tolerant about her problem, but then they just stopped their kind behavior at the end of the story. Nancy said,”I got the sign. It was on the table when I came in. It was a hog bone with meat still on it laying by the lamp. He’s out there. When yawl walk out that door, I gone,” (Page 229). One of the last things the little boy said as he walked away from Nancy’s home and left her to face a certain death is, “ I am not a n*****” (261), which was his horrible way of saying he believed he did not have to be involved with anyone less fortunate than he was. The white family othered their cook because of their ignorance.lack families. The family had the opportunity to help their cook and keep her safe, but they decided to not get involved. They withdrew their support and care, and allowed their frightened friend to be bludgeoned in the darkness of her own home.

2. I think it relates to the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, because it is set in the same time period and illustrates the racial divide during that time. It also shows that values such as honesty, respect for others, kindness, and empathy are taught at home. If Nancy had been the cook in Atticus’ home, Atticus would have taught his children about morals and the proper way to treat someone.

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