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Mental Health and its Impact on School Ability

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students

In “Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students” Aeg Anderson and Kavitha Cardoza state that many kids are struggling behind the scenes with mental disorders, and how schools are not doing anything to help. More and more kids are being proven - or usually not - to have the disorders, and nothing is being done to help them, sometimes things just worsening with the added pressure of school. They’re shamed for poor academic performance while already stressed, and that just adds to the panic. This can cause absences (more than the norm), low grades, bad behavioral choices during class, and eventually just quitting school altogether. School is where they are 6-8 hours of the day, they have to have noticed something.

(And if they can take the time to look for and out LGBT kids to their parents, they can look for and tell parents their kids have depression. Just saying.)

I chose this one to go first because it offers more of a generalized view on schools and mental illness, with a good introduction on how school affects the children with the disorders. It's a good way to transition into thinking about mental issues in a school environment.

npr.org
Opinion | Is the Drive for Success Making Our Children Sick?

Opinion | Is the Drive for Success Making Our Children Sick?

Vicki Abeles explains in ‘Is the Drive for Success Making Our Children Sick?’ that there are much higher levels of stress in schoolchildren, possibly due to rising expectations in schools. Many teens (One in three) have reported that the stress of school has driven them to depression. The amount of homework cutting into their sleep doesn’t help either, worsening existing mental conditions, and causing a lack of focus in class; Which, in turn, leads to more work being done at home, and less sleep because of it, causing a never-ending cycle of sleep deprivation and dropping grades. At a school where many anti-stress features had been implemented, grades went up noticeably and the kids are still getting accepted into good colleges.

I chose this one to be in the middle because it has a bit more of an actual story than the first, but not by much. It helps give you a look into how school stress actually affects students and ends with a look into what the anti-stress features do to help, and how they do it well.

nytimes.com
One out of five children have mental illness, and schools often don't help

One out of five children have mental illness, and schools often don't help

In "One out of five children have mental illness, and schools often don't help" Jenny Gold talked about two girls that had mood disorders, Laney (8) with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and Sydney (15) with bipolar disorder. She explained how much the girls struggled with school, each in their own ways; Laney with being disruptive and Sydney with an inability to focus or absorb information. As many schools do not screen well for mental issues or have the resources to deal with them if found, Sydney was taken out and homeschooled while Laney had her medicine adjusted, and both of them are doing much better then they had been. Their mother said that “You think as a parent you’re supposed to just say, ‘Get up and go back to school’ the next day. And so you really have to sometimes stop and take stock of what’s going on and maybe change the path."

I chose this one to go last because it has a more personal story about struggles with mental issues for the two girls, and after the first two seems to be a good ending point, finishing on a happier note and all.

pbs.org