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Otherness, and the fear of "the other"

For my curation project, I researched the several sub-themes that comprise the overall theme of otherness, as well as what otherness actually is.

How woman are viewed as "the other".
google.com

How woman are viewed as "the other".

1.) The picture shown depicts the core of the traditional thoughts about women. Although in today's world these stereotypes aren't as common, some still today believe that women should be seen as inferior, and not treated in a humane way. The picture illustrates a woman, displaying real google searches that have been searched over her mouth. The searches suggest that women should only do housework, and have limited freedom of speech. It tells the viewer that women should not be in the workplace, and are worth little to nothing when compared to male figures. Woman have been othered by society for decades and decades by the discrimination and stereotypes that they cannot seem to escape. Women have and in some cases today are told that they are not good enough, and cannot do the many things that the men around them are allowed to and can do. They are portrayed often in today's world as an object, and not a person, where it is okay to treat them poorly just because of their gender. While the search bar covers the woman's mouth, viewers can infer that the searches define that the woman should not have a voice and should be looked at by the society as "the other" if she were to go against the misogynistic ideas of the world. It shows that the woman in the picture should and should be treated like a slave, and instead of pursuing a dream or being in the workplace where men are supposed to be, she should just abide by the traditional rules that woman are less than men, and continue to be viewed as "the other" to the male-dominated society.
2.) Throughout the book To Kill a Mockingbird, a young girl named Scout Finch struggles during her youth as she tries to overcome the gender inequality throughout her town and across the country, even in her own home. When a young boy named Dill comes to visit the Finches over the summer, Jem and he begin to have a stronger bond than Scout does because they are both boys. Many times throughout the summer, Scout wants to tag along on their fun adventures and playtime. Several times, she was told to go away because she acted too much like a girl, and it was put in her mind that girls were never liked by anyone, from what her brother had told her. She observed that women of all ages in the town had to act a certain way, and had to be ladylike all of the time. They too were viewed as "the other". She had been told by the boys and other Maycomb residents that she shouldn't play or act like a boy because it was unladylike, and people would look down on you if you did. The picture connects to the novel in the way that women are looked at as though they are meant to do housework, obey their husbands, act ladylike, and have no fun.

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Racism, an aspect of Otherness
time.com

Racism, an aspect of Otherness

1.) From the beginning, many American societies have perceived people of color with ignorant, racist stereotypes that some may say are "poisoning our society". These stereotypes have managed to proceed in societies far and wide for centuries throughout American history. Even though the harsh intolerance towards African Americans has lessened throughout the years, some still remain today. The piece argues that the racist thoughts and actions that have been carried out in the past "add up to a pattern in which people of color are routinely and systematically treated differently than white people" (Watkins). The piece goes into depth on the unfairness when it comes to the laws being broken. It suggests that "Young white men smashing windows, overturning cars, and battling police after a big athletic event are “revelers,” 'out of control fans.' But a group of mostly African American youth who do similar things out of sorrow and rage that a young black man has died in police custody are dangerous 'thugs'" (Watkins). The unfairness is recognized when a white man's actions are viewed as a mistake are forgiven, while a black man that might have made a similar mistake is labeled by society as a threat. This piece exemplifies "the other" by showing how black people in the past and in many cases today are viewed as "the enemy", or as different from society. People of color are othered by society by the prejudiced stereotypes that have polluted our societies.
2.) The novel, To Kill a Mockingbird shares similarity with this article, as it exemplifies one of the major sections in the book. A character in the novel, a black man named Tom Robinson is brought to court for a felony that he is said to have committed by a white man, Bob Ewell. During the trial, Tom's lawyer Atticus Finch proves Bob Ewell's allegations to be untrue with strong evidence and points. By the end of the trial, after all that has been said, it is hard to believe that Tom Robinson had actually committed the crime, and many knew so too. However, in the long run, Tom Robinson ends up guilty and is ordered to be incarcerated. After, Atticus explains that he is not surprised they lost because at this time, it is always a white man's word against a black man, and no matter what, the white man will always win. Tom Robinson had been feared as "the enemy" or "the other" by Maycomb's society, just because of his skin color.

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What is Otherness, and how to people fear "The Other"?
othersociologist.com

What is Otherness, and how to people fear "The Other"?

1.) This piece exemplifies the theme of otherness by showing how it incorporates itself in society today. Within the theme of otherness, there are several components such as racism, sexism, ageism, and many other of the same nature. The article hones in on the continuous fear of "the other", not only in past years but in today's society as well. The text states that people begin to sort themselves out by abiding by the: "Ideas of similarity and difference" (Dr. Zuleyka Zevallos). Society implies that your gender, ethnicity, age, and social standing come into play while determining your identity and/or your otherness. From the start, "identities are produced through agreement, disagreement, and negotiation with other people" (Dr. Zuleyka Zevallos). If you are a woman, you are perceived opposite to a man, which can also be known as "the other". If you have a different skin color or receive less income than the other members of your community, you may also be recognized as an opposite, or, nevertheless, "the other". Someone that may exhibit traits of otherness may not fit into a certain social group or may be seen as a loner, or awkward. This person may only have a few friends, but is mostly an introvert, and spends time by themselves instead of with others.
2.) Many of the topics highlighted throughout the text are in relation to the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by American author Harper Lee. Throughout the book, many of the sub-themes included in the overall theme of otherness such as sexism, racism, and several more are exhibited in the novel. From beginning to end, Maycomb residents tend to demonstrate a townwide pattern of intolerance and ignorance directed towards many people that are seen to not fit in well with the community. These people are viewed as "the other". For instance, Mr. Arthur Radley, also known as Boo, comes from a background of mysterious people, that the people in Maycomb are very suspicious about. He is known to rarely come out of the house, and few have come face to face with him. Without knowledge of who Boo Radley really is, people are quick to judge and spread fictitious rumors about him, as they view him as "the other", who the children, and some adults, deeply fear.

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