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The book 1984 by George Orwell and the poem Mind Control by Sydnirambo, both explore the dystopian element of a figurehead or concept being worshipped and the idea that the strength of a group wo

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The book 1984 by George Orwell and the poem Mind Control by Sydnirambo, both explore the dystopian element of a figurehead or concept being worshipped and the idea that the strength of a group working together can overpower the authority of a figurehead. The children of 1984 are programmed by Big Brother to systematically “...turn against their parents...taught to spy on them and report their deviations” (146). Orwell in 1984 points out that a family broken down to go against each of the other members leads to the availability for a stronger force, such as the Party and Big Brother, to gain control of them. In order for Big Brother and the Party to remain the dominant power and be worshipped by citizens under their control, they need for there to be a fall in the connections and unity of a family who could potentially overthrow the head if not taken care of (separated) sooner. A family, besides being a group of people who have a direct genetic relationship, can also be seen as a group of people where one feels a sense of power, love, and acceptance. Teaching the children to spy against their parents, as well as other members in a family, will ensure that no secrets or plots are kept from the Party. Orwell warns his readers that a rift created between those who love one another will eventually be led to the fall of a trustworthy power which could stop any harm or dominance from reaching in and using the members for their own personal needs, just like Big Brother uses everyone to be worshipped and praised. In Mind Control, according to author Sydnirambo, fighting against a ruler who “open our minds and captures our memories...” and “makes it difficult to remember...ourselves,” is impossible to defeat alone seeing that it makes anyone who tries feel “weak.” The speaker in Sydnirambo’s poem recognizes that being alone will only get you so far when battling against an already matured source of power. The feeling of weakness and fatigue, when one realizes that they don’t have enough voice or ability within a society to form a trustworthy group, overcomes individuals causing them to be pushed right back under the preexisting power of the worshipped figurehead. Alone, people may not have the strength needed to fight against an authority that can manipulate each individual. However, working together, a group will be able to counterattack the force with a much greater ability. Goldstein’s book, in 1984, states that the figureheads keep individuals under their rule at “...the same low level” as everyone else “by splitting the intelligence” so “they can twist reality into whatever shape they choose...” (217). Through Goldstein’s book, Orwell explains how the Party and Big Brother gain control of each citizen through the action of separation of the power each person holds within themselves. The Party, in order to stay in the lead as a godly figure, must keep the potential rival (being the grouping of citizen’s and their intelligence) divided to prevent the act of being overthrown. The speaker in Mind Control states that he is “tired of being the victim mind control,” turns to the other people under the figurehead and asks: “When are we going to step up?” Sydnirambo shows the dependence the speaker has on the others to step up and make a change. The speaker acknowledges the fact that what is needs to be done is to step up together and not alone. Because, as analyzed before, fighting alone will not give you the strength needed to fight against a stronger power. The belief that Sydnirambo shares through the speaker is that in order to stop being the victim of a mind manipulating, worshipped concept or leader, an individual must rise with others to become one strong power; a power much stronger than the figurehead. Given the idea of overpowering the dystopian element of a concept or figurehead being worshipped, both the book (1984 by George Orwell) and the poem (Mind Control by Sydnirambo) establish the belief that the threat to the power of said figurehead would be the ability for individuals to come and work together to fight against it.



*** The author’s full name was never found. ***

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