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Perspectives of the Vietnam War

President Richard Nixon Address to the Nation on the War in Vietnam, November 3, 1969 - NE

President Richard Nixon Address to the Nation on the War in Vietnam, November 3, 1969 - NE

This speech is commonly referred to as the "Silent Majority Speech." The President spoke at 9:32 p.m. from his office in the White House. Nixon referred to the "silent majority," a large amount of Americans who did not join the protests against the war in Vietnam, yet did not express their support. The speech laid out his plans for ending the war through diplomatic negotiation and was incredibly successful, drawing thousands of letters of support.

youtube.com
The Other Side of Vietnam: How the Winners Remember the War

The Other Side of Vietnam: How the Winners Remember the War

North Vietnamese reflect on the conflict 40 years after the fall of Saigon.
Rejoice was on the mind of the soldier as he did not hear bombs or airplanes in the air and he realized the war was FINALLY over and that Vietnam was reunited once and for all.

theatlantic.com
North Vietnamese veterans stories

North Vietnamese veterans stories

Veterans of the Vietnam War tell their stories 40 years after the conflict ended.
The war brought pain to the Vietnamese people and the soldiers struggled to make money and provide for their families while at war. War also caused brokenness between families and friends

bbc.com
Meeting With the Enemy: Vietnam From a Vietnamese Perspective

Meeting With the Enemy: Vietnam From a Vietnamese Perspective

A veteran of the Vietnam War meets a survivor of the American War in an intense exchange of experiences from opposite sides.
The interviewer felt regret for causing the "death, destruction, injuries, and deformities" that the USA caused the Vietnamese.

truth-out.org
Nixon Prolonged Vietnam War for Political Gain—And Johnson Knew About It, Newly Unclassifi

Nixon Prolonged Vietnam War for Political Gain—And Johnson Knew About It, Newly Unclassifi

Article writes about how the US was in the war for longer than it needed to, and how Richard Nixon (running for president at the time) prolonged the war so he could get the votes he needed to win the election. His choice was obviously biased as well, being American and prolonging a war for his own political gain.

smithsonianmag.com
Redirect Notice

Redirect Notice

Students are close to the age now where they are old enough to register as a US voter. If the students don't register then the government wont be able to draft them. Hence the sign, "resist the draft don't register"

google.com
U.S. Marine Tom Smith's Firsthand Account of the Vietnam War | HistoryNet

U.S. Marine Tom Smith's Firsthand Account of the Vietnam War | HistoryNet

Marine Tom Smith remembers his account of the Vietnam war, straight fro m the front lines. His possible bias could be from obviously being an American, or also from seeing the horrors of the war.

historynet.com
Meeting With the Enemy: Vietnam From a Vietnamese Perspective

Meeting With the Enemy: Vietnam From a Vietnamese Perspective

A veteran of the Vietnam War meets a survivor of the American War in an intense exchange of experiences from opposite sides.

truth-out.org
Vietnam: Students

Vietnam: Students

Even though students and youths weren't the only ones to protest, they still were an important aspect when bringing antiwar ideas to the broad public. The University of Washington has a rich antiwar history, civil rights, and radical activism.

depts.washington.edu
North Vietnamese veterans stories

North Vietnamese veterans stories

Veterans of the Vietnam War tell their stories 40 years after the conflict ended.

bbc.com
The Other Side of Vietnam: How the Winners Remember the War

The Other Side of Vietnam: How the Winners Remember the War

North Vietnamese reflect on the conflict 40 years after the fall of Saigon.

theatlantic.com