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Jackson  Davenport
Jackson Davenport

Ryan Howard Isn’t Ready to Call It a Career-

Ryan Howard was once one of baseball’s most feared sluggers, a winner of the National League Most Valuable Player Award and a World Series champion, the toast of Philadelphia.

How To Train Your Arm For Baseball –

How To Train Your Arm For Baseball –

Throwing is a lost art. Throwing isn't something that we should do "just" to get our arms loose. Throwing should be done to maximize that skill, to develop it like any other skill to be a strength rather than a potential career threatening weakness. When a player is "out of season" there is an extended period of time that can be devoted to throwing only for the purpose of conditioning (i.e. building arm health, strength and endurance). Your arm needs to stay conditioned all year long so you don’t hurt it.

jaegersports.com
The Evolution of the Baseball

The Evolution of the Baseball

The National League was founded in 1876. That year, a pitcher for the Chicago White Stockings named A.G. Spalding pitched a design that the league chose to adopt as its standard. That's also how Spalding's sporting goods business came to power. According to a 1946 New York Times article, a bit of Australia started going into baseballs in 1920 when Spalding started using Australian wool on the insides. William McNeil wrote in The Evolution of Pitching in Major League Baseball that the new yarn was stronger and allowed for a more tightly wound ball.

bleacherreport.com
How did Aaron Judge become this good this fast?

How did Aaron Judge become this good this fast?

Aaron Judge (6’’7’ 282) is leading the league in homeruns with 13 homeruns. Judge, 25, was the 32nd overall selection in the 2013 draft, a year in which the Yanks held multiple first-round selections. His massive stature and plus-plus raw power made him stand out, but his numbers in three seasons at Fresno State told a different story. He struck out, but not at an alarming rate (averaging 46 K's in 234 plate appearances per year, just under 20 percent).

espn.com