September 6, 2017

Top N.S. pediatrician calls for free tuition for youth in foster care

Top N.S. pediatrician calls for free tuition for youth in foster care

Nova Scotia’s top pediatrician, Dr. Andrew Lynk, says the British Columbia government’s new plan to waive post-secondary tuition fees for existing or former children in foster care will pay off over the long term.

thechronicleherald.ca
VOICE OF THE PEOPLE - Sept. 6, 2017

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE - Sept. 6, 2017

Full confidence in IWK

thechronicleherald.ca
As students head back to class, local expert says not all stress is bad - NEWS 95.7

As students head back to class, local expert says not all stress is bad - NEWS 95.7

HALIFAX – With classes starting back up this week, students may be a little more stressed than usual. But according to a local mental health expert, that’s not always a bad thing. Dalhousie psychiatry

news957.com
Our Housecall focuses on hearing loss

Our Housecall focuses on hearing loss

Find out how undiagnosed hearing loss can impact learning in our Housecall.

atlantic.ctvnews.ca
allNovaScotia

allNovaScotia

Government Business: Who came up short at the IWK?

allnovascotia.com
Exercise in youth may strengthen adult brain: study

Exercise in youth may strengthen adult brain: study

Exercise could act as buffer against declines in brain health and memory

beta.theglobeandmail.com
The staggering number of children reported missing from Nova Scotia group homes

The staggering number of children reported missing from Nova Scotia group homes

A CBC News investigation shows that over six years there have been 2,655 reports of children missing from 15 residential facilities for youth in provincial care.

cbc.ca
Century-old tuberculosis vaccine more effective than previously known: study

Century-old tuberculosis vaccine more effective than previously known: study

Many countries have never adoped the vaccine due to flaws

beta.theglobeandmail.com
Vaginal estrogen not tied to cancer or heart disease risks in U.S. study

Vaginal estrogen not tied to cancer or heart disease risks in U.S. study

Using vaginally applied estrogen to ease menopause symptoms likely doesn’t increase a woman’s risk of heart disease or certain cancers, an observational study in the U.S. suggests.

cbc.ca