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Yesi Garcia
Yesi Garcia

The Basics Of Solar Eclipses

The History, and The Science of Space's Art.

Basics

Basics

The Article/Website shows that the Moon and Sun look like they are the same exact size to the human's eye appearance. When the Moon goes in front of the Sun, but it does not completely cover up the Sun. In the article they call that Annual Solar Eclipses, which the next Annual Solar Eclipse for the United States are in October 14, 2023.

I chose this article/website cause it explains a type of Eclipse and explains it to know what type of Solar Eclipse you will be watching in the sky.

greatamericaneclipse.com
A Total Solar Eclipse Isn't Total Everywhere

A Total Solar Eclipse Isn't Total Everywhere

to view a full solar eclipsed Sun, totality with the naked eye, cameras, telescopes, binoculars without any special filters. BUT do not look at the very beginning of a solar eclipse you must wait for Baily's beads to disappear. And must look away before Baily's beads to reappear.
I chose this article because it tells us how to look at the Solar Eclipse with the naked eye and other devices without any special filters.

timeanddate.com
History of Eclipses - Facts & Summary - HISTORY.com

History of Eclipses - Facts & Summary - HISTORY.com

When a lunar eclipse is happening, the Moon turns to a reddish color, because the only light being views through the Earth's shadow. Total lunar eclipses are sometimes called blood moons. The website also shows the History of the few first Solar Eclipses, The first Eclipse was in November 30, 3340 B.C. Scientist know that was the first one by seeing a circular and spiral shaped petroglyphs at the Loughcrew Megalithic Monument in County in County Meath, Ireland.

history.com
Why scientists are so excited about this solar eclipse

Why scientists are so excited about this solar eclipse

On Monday 21 of August, a shadow will go over across North America as millions of people enjoy and watch a solar eclipse, the first one to come to N. America since 1918. Although a total solar eclipse when the new moon passes in front of the sun and blocks it out completely, happens once every year or two somewhere in the world, it's still a rare sight. Roughly 70 percent of Earth's surface is covered only by the oceans, causing many to not see it on land.

nbcnews.com