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The Language of Conflict By Alli Measer

Looking at the Civil Rights Movement through multiple points of view

The Civil Rights Movement
sites.google.com

The Civil Rights Movement

In this political cartoon you see a police officer with “racism” on his back. He is talking to a character representing Rosa Parks during the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He is telling her “I told you to move to the back of the bus” which she seems to be refusing. In the top left corner it reads “there are times “no” is the most eloquent word”.
This cartoon stood out to me because it shows Rosa Parks refusing racism. I think when we think about Rosa Parks and her bus boycotts we don’t always remember that it was racist against them. By refusing to sit in the back of the bus with just the word “no”, she also is refusing racism and we saw that in many other areas of the Civil Rights Movement.
MLA Citation: “Primary Sources, Quotes - The Civil Rights Movement.” Google Sites, sites.google.com/site/mrricerocks/classroom-pictures.

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Brittney Cooper: The racial politics of time
ted.com

Brittney Cooper: The racial politics of time

Brittney Cooper is an African American woman that believes that in order to get anywhere, we need to go against time. She believes that time has always taken advantage of Civil Rights. An example she uses is that the Voting Rights Act wasn’t put in place until 100 years after the Civil War. That although things were happening, they took much longer than they should have. She also talks about how when people think back on history they never seems to remember what African Americans did unless it helped them in some way. She explains that they are just taking up space in time, not time in general.
I think that what Cooper is talking about is upsetting. She wants us to notice that although certain things we say might seems acceptable, they could also be insensitive. Although the Civil Rights Movement seems as if it happened so long ago, it is still a problem not entirely fixed to this day. By opening our minds and putting our time together we should be able to accomplish more that we have been going at since the beginning of time for any race.
MLA Citation: Cooper, Brittney. “The Racial Politics of Time.” TED: Ideas Worth Spreading, www.ted.com/talks/brittney_cooper_the_racial_politics_of_time#t-206951.

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Martin Luther King I Have a Dream Speech
americanrhetoric.com

Martin Luther King I Have a Dream Speech

Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous I Have a Dream speech in the 1963 March on Washington. He speaks to a group of Civil Rights leaders, and activists, about what he wanted to see in the U.S. He talks mostly about wanting racial segregation to end and wanting equal opportunities for his children then they would have if they were white.
This speech influenced people for generations. King wrote this speech to those who were giving up. He paints an image in the listeners head about a world they want to be a part of. They are no boundaries and he contradicts specific events against reality. This speech is marked as one of the most important events in the Civil Rights Movement, because it was created to encourage and help people imagine a perfect reality.
MLA Citation: “Martin Luther King I Have a Dream Speech - American Rhetoric.” American Rhetoric: Eleanor Roosevelt -- "The Struggle for Human Rights", www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadream.htm.

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See the Civil Rights Movement in Photographs
time.com

See the Civil Rights Movement in Photographs

These images from Time magazine show the ups, and downs of the Civil Rights Movement. It shows the nine black students going to Little Rock High School, and people voting for the first time, or people marching or participating in sit-ins for the movement. You have people at a funeral crying over loved ones and people of color being abused by police. There are leadership conferences and people standing up for themselves.
I think these images show the point of view of the Civil Rights Movement from the people fighting the hardest. It shows the brutality and deaths and how hard they worked while also showing there happiness when they accomplished things. It shows their hard work and the photojournalists showed this with images that we can now look back on for generations to come and always understand what they went through to get to where our country is today.
MLA Citation: “Civil Rights Movement: See the History in Photographs.” Time, Time, time.com/3910062/civil-rights-photographs/.

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Opinion | The Work of Ensuring Civil Rights
nytimes.com

Opinion | The Work of Ensuring Civil Rights

This opinion article is written about the renewal of the Voting Rights Act in 2006. It states that the Civil Rights Movement is important to the history for our country and has never been a question until recently. With the government recently leaning more right, there was the most bipartisan support ever about this Act being renewed.
I think the author of this article wanted to make a statement about our government rather than the Civil Rights itself. He believes whoever is in control of the government has the power to change the lives of so many people. This act protected African Americans voting rights for generations without people trying to take it away until this 2006 election. He wanted to show that not everyone accepts this Act, but they should because “racial equality is a universal and central core value of unique importance” (The New York Times).
MLA Citation: “The Work of Ensuring Civil Rights.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 7 Mar. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/opinion/civil-rights.html.

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Dr. King Is Assassinated
history.com

Dr. King Is Assassinated

This source was written to explain the murder of Martin Luther King Jr. It states James Earl Ray’s fingerprints were found on the murder weapon and he was found after escaping to Canada. He pleaded guilty after they threatened him to the death penalty, but later stated that a man named Raoul had approached him and told him to do it. There is a conspiracy theory that the government was against King and they were behind his assassination because they didn’t like him talking about Civil Rights.
In my opinion, no matter who had planned the attack, they were obviously against what King was standing for. They wanted to stop him, but not be held responsible. The person that planned the attack had an opinion not shown often when talking about the Civil Rights Movement. It shows the story of people wanting white supremacy rather than what most of the country was fighting for at the time, but were scared if they were caught against it, it would look bad on them.
MLA Citation: “Dr. King Is Assassinated.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, www.history.com/this-day-in-history/dr-king-is-assassinated.

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