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The Science of Love

By: Alyse Cormier

The Psychology of Romantic Love | Psych Central
psychcentral.com

The Psychology of Romantic Love | Psych Central

Love is perhaps the highest ideal to humans, and relationships give our lives meaning and purpose. Being loved validates our sense of self-esteem, overcomes shame based doubts, and soothes our fears of loneliness. Our brains are wired to fall in love and to feel the bliss and euphoria of romance, to enjoy pleasure, and to bond and procreate. We are attracted to subtle physical attributes that uncounsiously, remind us of a family member. We can be attracted to someone who shares emotional and behavioral patterns with a member of our family even before they become apparent. Love brings out parts of our personality that were dormant.

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3 Vital Elements of Attraction
psychologytoday.com

3 Vital Elements of Attraction

The ways in which each of us decide to be attractive depends on our own traits, and what kind of relationship we are looking for. Usually, short-term and more exclusively sexual relationships require the most physical attractiveness, with looks becoming of lesser importance as relationships lean toward intimacy, sharing, and long-term support. It is through confidence and self keeping that attrictiveness is displayed. Yet Yet, no one can allow solely on attraction or pyschological traits and expect a successful relationship. developing psychological attractiveness involves learning the skills to develop rapport with others.

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How Many Seconds to a First Impression?
psychologicalscience.org

How Many Seconds to a First Impression?

All it takes is a tenth of a second to form an impression of a stranger from their face, and that longer exposures do not significantly alter those impressions. These judgements play a powerful role in how we treat others and how we are treated in return. An experiment was conducted to study judgments from facial appearance, each focusing on a different trait: attractiveness, likeability, competence, trustworthiness, and aggressiveness. What was revealed after the experiment was that the participants made their judgments as quickly after seeing a face for 1/10 of a second as they did if given a longer glimpse. Future research may even show less of a judgement time than 1/10th of a second. It may be that, to impress a prospective employer with your competence and trustworthiness, or a prospective mate with your attractiveness, you can do it in no time.

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Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful
timeshighereducation.com

Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful

The article debates reasons of why attractive people fare better in the labor market and generate more profit for their companies. Customers, co-workers and employers are willing to pay to interact with more attractive people. Racial and gender discrimination is drawn to the discussion of beauty with striking parallels. Yet, beauty is arguably less objective. Beauty shown through the economic lens gives a sense of disturbance.

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Survival of the Prettiest: Harvard Cognitive Scientist Nancy Etcoff on the Science of Beau
brainpickings.org

Survival of the Prettiest: Harvard Cognitive Scientist Nancy Etcoff on the Science of Beau

For centuries people have tried to define beauty with a metaphysical explanation, yet we have continued to strive for the tangible material answer. Nancy Etcoff, in her book, The Survival of the Prettiest, tells of beauty's quelling physical desire and how people ignore the reality of love and how beauty is misunderstood. She also explains the persuasion the media holds within our preferences, by using a crowd-pleasing image of perfected beauty. Each of us spend countless hours trying to perfect our flaws and go about in search of the ideal beauty that is incrested within the hands of society.

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Snap-Judgment Science
psychologicalscience.org

Snap-Judgment Science

The human brain makes a snap-judgement of what their opinion is for another within the second of encounter. These first impressions color the way we interact with people from the unconscious process of the mind. Knowing how people size each other up has significant implications for identifying implicit bias, discrimination, and stereotyping. Our decisions are influenced by the desire of commontality; naturally, we prefer to interact with people we have enough common ground with. The thought of new ideas, new looks, and new people can be exciting, but they can not be so different to us that we feel unsafe.

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What Is Love? Here’s The Science…
iflscience.com

What Is Love? Here’s The Science…

With love, comes lost; these two feelings take part with one another incoherently. We typically enter a series of romantic relationships in search for “the one." Yet, with this search comes loss. The loss of romantic love is widespread, either through the break-up of a relationship or bereavement. While distressing, most people are able to cope and move on from this loss. The reality of true love is rather complex, in which many are taking the effort to examine and discover more about the brains obsession with love.

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Yes, Looks Do Matter
nytimes.com

Yes, Looks Do Matter

Snap judgments can be wrong, but scientists say they're only natural. There is not much one can do to control these thoughts, it is the way humans naturally think or react. When the brain first recognizes another individual, it immediately places them into impersonal categories. The two stereotypes are broken down into broad dimensions and it is whether a person appears to have malignant or benign intent and whether a person appears dangerous. Woman are also subdivided into “traditionally attractive” women, who “don’t look dominant, have baby-faced features,” and are said to not be threatening. Attractuve people are credited with being socially skilled. Maybe it is because if one is beautiful or handsome, others tend to interact with you in such a way that it is easy to be socially skilled. When people do not fit our preconceived notions, we tend to ignore the contradictions, until they are too dramatic to overlook.

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Elements of Attraction
psychologytoday.com

Elements of Attraction

We decide what we are attracted to based on our own traits, and also depending on what kind of relationships we are looking for. Short-term relationships require the most physical attractiveness, with looks becoming of lesser importance as relationships lean toward intimacy, sharing, and long-term support. It is the pyschological traits in which we find attractive that motivates long term relationships and connections of emotional intimacy. Body language also plays a role in first impressions. Everyone has a different style or a preferred style of attractiveness, whether it is for yourself or for your desired interests.

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Love, Actually: The science behind lust, attraction, and companionship - Science in the Ne
sitn.hms.harvard.edu

Love, Actually: The science behind lust, attraction, and companionship - Science in the Ne

Most think love comes from the heart, yet it is through our brain. Romantic love can be broken down into three categories: lust, attraction, and attachment. Each category is characterized by its own set of hormones stemming from the brain. Testosterone and estrogen drive lust; dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin create attraction; and oxytocin and vasopressin mediate attachment. Lust is driven by the desire for sexual gratification; the evolutionary basis for this stems from our need to reproduce. Love is often accompanied by jealousy, erratic behavior, and irrationality, along with a host of other negative emotions and moods. Attraction is much like an addiction to another human being. The same brain regions light up when we become addicted to material goods as when we become emotionally dependent on our partners.

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