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The Shashone-Bannock Tribe:The Beginning to Where They Are Today

In this exhibit, we will be explaining the traditions and lifestyle of the Shashone-Banncok tribe starting from the 1600s.And how they have incorporated these traditional customs into the present day.

History
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History

Starting in the 1600's two separate tribes, the Shoshone and Bannock, joined together to build one stronger tribe and to share resources. These two tribes joined together because they have a common language and share the similar moral beliefs and customs.

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Beliefs/ Ceremonies
trailtribes.org

Beliefs/ Ceremonies

Since the beginning of the Shoshone and Bannock tribes have existed, they have both shared many similar beliefs and ceremonies. One of the ceremonies (which I found with an unknown name) they had revolved around sincerity, truthfulness, and of course friendship. According to Meriwether’s observations in her diary, the ritual involves taking off your shoes before they receive then smoke the pipe of a stranger. Taking off the shoes symbolized sincerity and truthfulness. The receiving and smoking the pipe of a stranger’s is representative of friendship. Today, the Shoshone- Bannock tribe still participates in this ritual with strangers who are willing to participate

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Geography/ Location
shoshonebannocktribes.com

Geography/ Location

Starting from the 1600’s to today's present day, the Shoshone- Bannock tribe has in total lived in the vast regions of today's Canada, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Oregon, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Idaho. They traveled from place to place for various reasons. They traveled to the Montana region area mainly for the purpose of Buffalo hunting. However, they also have traveled to different areas for the reason hunting and also of accommodating the Euro- American settlers at the the time. Thus, being the reason for the setup of Fort Hall. Fort Hall was established in 1834, it was a trading post where different tribes and Euro- American settlers could come together and trade items in peace. Today, the Shoshone- Bannock tribe’s reservation is located on 251,890 acres in southern Idaho. This is also where the Fort Hall Trading Post is today

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Music and Dance
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Music and Dance

Since the Shoshone- bannock tribe first began playing and practicing music, it has been a huge part of their culture. They have many different styles of dance such as, Men's traditional, grass/fancy, bustle, and men and women combined. The women have the traditional, jingle and fancy. To keep their culture alive the Shoshone bannock have a yearly powwow. The powwow is always held the second week of August in Fort Hall, Idaho. Thousands of native Shoshone- Bannock tribal people nfrom all over North America gather to compete in singing, dancing, and drumming competitions. Music and dance in modern times is just as important to the tribe as it was when they started in the 1600’s.

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Food
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Food

The Shoshone-Bannock tribe mainly eats types of grass, rice, grain, and buffalo. Even now, as a part of their customs, they have continued to eat the same traditional dishes today. One of the traditional dishes the tribe’s people still eats is sand grass. Sand grass is basically what it sounds like; it's a type of grass that grows in the sand. It doesn't contain a lot of nutritional value, however, it suited their needs and was an easy snack for traveling. Indian Millet is another example of a traditional food item the Shoshone- Bannock tribe eats. What it is, is a widespread name for many different types of plants. Some of the included plants are Sorghum bicolor, Stipa hymenoides, Panicum miliaceum, Penicillaria spicata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Oryzopsis hymenoides. Buffalo is also, another main dish for this tribe. Buffalo is species of bison that roams around grassy fields in herds. The Shoshone- Bannock tribe went on hunts throughout the Montana region to hunt the Buffalo. Today, the Shoshone-Bannock tribe still eats these traditional dishes as well as others. However, the tribe eats common modern food as well.

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Language
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Language

The Shoshone-Bannock have spoken a dialect of the northern painte language since the 1600’s. During the 1600’s, almost 100% of the tribe, including children spoke the language. In modern times, most members of the tribe only speak English. As a way to keep their language alive, and to spread it, some of the tribal elders partnered with a nearby college to create a game that taught the Shoshone- Bannock language in a fun, and simple way. The game is called Enee, to complete the game the players would have had to learn a basic understanding of Shoshone words, phrases and different cultural elements.

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Clothing
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Clothing

The cloths of the Bannock tribe consisted of breechcloths or aprons made from sagebrush bark. In the cold Winter months, twined bark leggings and poncho like shirts were also worn. The fibers used to make the cloths are harvested from sagebrush bark and tule ( a type of bulrushe). The fibers were damped and pummeled until they could be worn or twined. Robes or c loaks were made from furs, especially rabbit furs, for added warmth. Today, the Shoshone- Bannock tribal people still where these items today. However, they also have incorporated some new modern techniques and styles to their clothing.

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Homes
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Homes

The Shoshone-Bannock tribe lived in various types of huts throughout the year. During the Summer months they would build and live in temporary shelters made of windbreakers. However, during the Winter months the tribe built and lived in flimsy huts covered in rushes and bunches of grass called bush. These items together resulted in bush shelters. The materials used in bush shelters are called sagebrush, willow, branches, leaves and grass (bush) that were available in the area they were currently located at. The more permanent winter homes consisted of cone shaped huts or houses called wickiups. Wickiups were built using a frame of boughs and covered with reeds, branches, and grass. Today, the structure of their homes are unknown.

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Modern Day
shoshonebannocktribes.com

Modern Day

At the Shoshone- Bannock reservation the tribe, still to this day, preserves its traditions and customs that their ancestors were raised on. Today their reservation is on 251,890 acres of their sacred land in southern Idaho. This is also the place where the Fort Hall trading post is today. It is still tribally owned and operated but has accommodated to today's modern day by turning it into a trading post grocery store. The tribe still teaches and practices its traditions and customs by still participating in the traditional clothing, language, food, music, dancing, ceremonies, and beliefs.

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