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The Top Five Learning and Memory Strategies

#5 Retrieval Practice

#5 Retrieval Practice

Retrieval practice is a very good way to learn also. Instead of constantly writing stuff down, or trying to remember it, instead you would speak it. You could speak to yourself or others, or even practice with your animals. Keep speaking to yourself or out loud and you could remember! One bad thing is since you speak about it out loud to yourself or others, often times you could forget later on. (Recency)

retrievalpractice.org
#4 What is MAINTENANCE REHEARSAL?

#4 What is MAINTENANCE REHEARSAL?

Maintenance rehearsal is probably the most mainstream way to teach either yourself or others to remember something, or get better with something. For example, for me I play guitar. In guitar class I have to practice and practice guitar repeatedly to get it down.

psychologydictionary.org
#3 Chunking: How can I use Chunking as an Effective Memory Strategy?

#3 Chunking: How can I use Chunking as an Effective Memory Strategy?

Chunking is a good way to categorize your information into groups to easily remember them. For example: spoon, dish washer, fork, knife.
Chunking is a good method to use even for science class when you're grouping the Periodic Table.

k12teacherstaffdevelopment.com
#2 Elaboration Strategies

#2 Elaboration Strategies

For elaboration, Elaboration is taking a topic and speaking on it out loud and well, elaborating on the topic either to yourself or in front of others to become more comfortable with remembering it. I could use this as a good way to remember things because it would also make you better at rehearsing.

elaborationstrategies.weebly.c
#1 Spaced Learning: An Approach to Minimize the Forgetting Curve

#1 Spaced Learning: An Approach to Minimize the Forgetting Curve

For me, I do space my studying out over time. I'll usually study vocab words as soon as I get them, and then a few times in between, then I study again the night before I have a test. For me, this is a good way to remember things!

td.org