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TKAM- Taking A Stand Against Racism

Bridget Mahoney Period 1

CommonLit | Women in the Civil Rights Movement

CommonLit | Women in the Civil Rights Movement

1. Throughout the Civil Rights Movement, women took major roles in protests and were extremely important participants in the movement, even though many people only acknowledge men for their actions in history. Rosa Parks is a monumental figure known for refusing to give up her bus seat, but had also been involved in organizations against racism for years before she did this. She was such an inspiration because "After the actions of Rosa Parks sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, women from many different organizations became the leading force that kept the boycott going." (Smith 2). Even though many people think of women in the background during the Civil Rights Movement, this shows their bravery and ability to take control. Out of the many women participants, three important roles were Ella Baker, Septima Clark, and Viola Liuzzo. Between these three women, organizations were founded, African Americans were taught how to read and write, and the movement was vastly spread. Unfortunately, Viola was shot at the age of 39 while she was transporting freedom marchers in Alabama. This shows the risk and target that women had. Besides facing danger, women also faced problems with sexism. They were denied roles of leadership and were thought of as less important as the men. However, "women did not allow discrimination to prevent them from being part of the fight for racial justice, seeking leadership positions, and struggling within the movement for equal treatment and acknowledgment" (11). African American women faced problems with both racism and gender inequality, but didn't let anything stop them. Doubt from other people only motivated them even more. The Civil Rights Movement would not have been anywhere as affective as it was without the powerful and brave women who participated in it.
2. Along with the strong women who impacted the Civil Rights Movement, there are multiple women in "To Kill A Mockingbird" that contributed to anti racism. Miss Maudie is an example of a woman who agrees with social equality. She supports Atticus and respects him for trying so hard to protect Tom Robinson. Scout may be too young to understand most adult concepts, but she also agrees with social equality. She is grateful for Calpurnia and thinks of her as family and also gets to know Mr. Raymond by learning that people don't like him because they prejudge him and get the wrong picture of him. However, the idea of social equality hasn't really spread through Maycomb so not many women have gotten to voice their opinions or take a stand yet.

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The Civil Rights movement | Pictures | Pics | Express.co.uk

The Civil Rights movement | Pictures | Pics | Express.co.uk

1. This picture shows only a few of the thousands of people who protested in the 1950s through 1960s for equal rights for African Americans. Even though most protesters were black, many whites also participated to shows their support. However, white protesters were putting themselves in just as much jeopardy as African American protesters because most people still disagreed with the equality that they were fighting for. The white people had to realize that they were going against what most whites believed in and could easily be attacked. To take a stand against racism, they needed confidence and bravery. Whites and blacks protesting together was a huge step towards social equality because they were showing their alliance and how powerful they could be together instead of divided. Their unity opened the eyes of many and was a huge turning point in the history of social inequality.
2. The act of going up against what most people think can be seen with white and black protesters and in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird". The white man in this photo is showing his bravery by protesting with African Americans and putting himself as a target for danger. Atticus also finds himself in the same situation by representing Tom Robinson in court. Even though this was his job as a lawyer, he did everything he could to protect and help Tom outside of the court room as well. This targeted Atticus since most white people in Maycomb still considered African Americans as less important than them. He received threats and was almost attacked by a group of men, but Atticus did not back down because he knew what was right. Both of these men are exemplifying the traits of a leader and are inspiring many to also take a stand against social inequality.

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CommonLit | The Civil Rights Act of 1964

CommonLit | The Civil Rights Act of 1964

1. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the America's legislation that outlawed discrimination against race, color, gender, religion, or national origin. It also requires equal access for jobs, schools and public places and provides equal right to vote. Before this legislation was passed segregation haunted the United States, until after World War II when the urge for change became grew. A major challenge came from the landmark Supreme Court case "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas" which "questioned the notion of separate but equal in public education. " (National Park Service 3). The Court noted how unhealthy the divided public facilities were and how they were a violation of the 14th Amendment. These people took a stand against racism and caused an encouragement to protect civl rights. From 1945 to 1957, Congress considered but failed to pass a civil rights bill until finally passing limited Civil Rights Acts in 1957 and 1960. Since these only resulted in little gains, "Sit-ins, boycotts,5 Freedom Rides, the founding of organizations such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), local demands for inclusion in the political process, all were in response to the increase in legislative activity through the 1950s and early 1960s" (4). People that participated in these protests had to build up huge amount of bravery and couldn't let anything stop them from achieving their goals. In 1963, four girls were killed in the bombing of a church in Birmingham and civil rights workers Medgar Evers and William L. Moore were murdered. By then, protesters knew they had to force the government to respond. In order to take a stand against these racial issues, people had to be willing to risk their safety. Their determination paid off when the bill was finally passed in 1964.
2. During the Civil Rights Movement, there were many disagreements with the law as well as there were in "To Kill A Mockingbird". During this movement, thousands of people risked their safety and did whatever it took to change the law. In the small town of Maycomb, there may not have been protests, but there were people in disagreement with the inequality. Jem realizes how unfairly Tom Robinson was treated in court and doesn't understand why the laws can't change faster. The community of African Americans know that Tom face consequences even if he is innocent, but they are still grateful for all that Atticus has done to help him. Atticus worked extremely hard to help Tom and they greatly respect him for stepping up. The white people in Maycomb don't really think about the case, but the blacks know how biased and unjust it was. Unfortunately, they know that any situation with an African American being pleaded guilty will not end well, no matter what the truth was.

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CommonLit | Texts

CommonLit | Texts

1. Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech exemplifies the importance of freedom from social inequality. He inspires people all around American to fight for justice using peace and knowledge instead of violence. He announces "Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force" (King 8). King was seen as a monumental figure in the Civil Rights Movement and was the voice for thousands of people. His hopes for African Americans' rights were motivation for change. He states the importance of not giving up and having faith. No African American will be satisfied until they receive the equality they deserve. King's speech empowered many through his motivational and hopeful words. He drives them to take a stand by telling them "Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children" (King 6). King gives people the courage they need to stand up for what they believe in. He stresses the urgency for this injustice to be stopped and doesn't believe there should be any rest or tranquility in America until change is seen.
2. Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech addresses many of the racial issues that are seen in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. King states how unequal African Americans are treated which connects to Tom Robinson's unfair trial. The blacks in Maycomb were viewed as less important than the whites and were looked down upon. King saying how African Americans were stuck in the chains of discrimination describes how they were also treated in the novel. Throughout King's speech, he inspires people to step up and take a stand for what they believe in. Atticus is an example of someone who took a stand against racism because he tried to do everything he could to prove that Tom was innocent and treated him with nothing but respect. He didn't judge him for his skin color and didn't view him as less important than a white client. Despite being threatened and called bad names, he continued to support Tom Robinson and stood up for him against social inequality. Atticus is the type of person that Martin Luther King Jr. would have been extremely proud of.

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