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Washoe Tribe: Expecting The Unexpected

The Washoe tribe is located in the surroundings of Lake Tahoe on the border of California and Nevada. There are around 1,500 Indians in this tribe recorded in 2007. This is all about the Washoe tribe

Wa She Shu It Deh festival (Ceremonies)

Wa She Shu It Deh festival (Ceremonies)

This is a famous festival held at the end of July that celebrates the Wa She Shi it Deh festival and craft festival at Valhalla, Lake Tahoe California. Representatives from tribes across the United States, Canada, Mexico and South America gather to celebrate native traditions. This longstanding festival, open to the public, features Native American dancing, master basket weaving display, food, crafts, and music. This is a ceremony and tradition that is very important to the Washoe Tribe especially the natives.

washoetribe.us
Washoe Tribe (Geography and Map)

Washoe Tribe (Geography and Map)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California operates the Meeks Bay Resort on the Western shore of Lake Tahoe. This map was made by the Washoe to show trade routes, show its surroundings and nearby land points. In addition, to show where their borders are on the land thought the map. The Washoe are in the Great Basin and Lake Tahoe, which is a land point near the Washoe Tribe.

washoetribe.us
Ong Bird (History)

Ong Bird (History)

This is a picture of the Ong bird. This bird was told to be so large and powerful it could bend trees when it flew near them. It is a legend that the bird nested in the middle of Lake Tahoe on Washoe tribal land. The Ong bird shows the Washoe history because the tribe believed this legend; of this bird. The legend is, the bird took a man of the Washoe with his monstrous beak, and took him back to his nesting grounds. The Ong had been falling ill. This monster was believed to be dead by the end of a severe storm that raged that night and dead by morning.

fs.usda.gov
Wickiup (Homes)

Wickiup (Homes)

The Washoe Tribes more permanent winter home was called a Galais Dungal (winter homes) known as "Wickiups". They were grass houses that consisted of cone-shaped huts that were built using a frame of willow boughs and covered with reeds, branches and grass. The Wikiup was rounded at the base and at the top of the dome was an open smoke hole for some air to be let out. Rocks were piled around the base of the grass house for added insulation. Occasionally, they were built over a 2-3 foot foundation. Sometimes other optional materials were added to make sure the cold was kept out. These were their homes for the whole winter that they built and helped them survive through the winter season!

warpaths2peacepipes.com
Rice Grass (Food)

Rice Grass (Food)

The food that the Wahoe Tribe ate was rice grass. Rice grass also known as sand grass and was the washoe tribes main food source. The seeds of rice grass were a natural food source and a staple food of Native American Indians, especially the Washoe tribe, who lived in the Great Basin area with a lot of rice grass food source in that area. This helps us understand that they use natural resources that the tribe can create or plant. This gave them nutrition and shows how they are resourceful with what they eat!

warpaths2peacepipes.com
Crow Beaded War Shirt (Clothing)

Crow Beaded War Shirt (Clothing)

This piece of clothing shows the kinds of things the higher class man wear and the kinds of decorations put onto the pieces of clothing the Washoe Tribe made and wear. They wear these shirts to work and to do daily activities, especially men. The Washoe made there clothing out of special materials and natural resources, that women sew together, for the men. This is just one of many pieces of clothing the Washoe wear and decorated with their own touch and style.

sothebys.com
Washoe Opening Prayer (Language)

Washoe Opening Prayer (Language)

Lake Tahoe provided the introduction of Steven James, a Washoe elder. Mr. James talked briefly of the very long past of the Washoe Tribe. In this video he speaks in the Washoe's very own language. The lady standing next to him is the girl translating from the Washoe language to english. This shows how the native language is still alive today. Steven remembering the past of the Washoe Tribe shows to all the people that take native tribes for granted. They are still here, and their native language is too.

youtube.com
Powwow 2011 in Carson City (Music and Dance)

Powwow 2011 in Carson City (Music and Dance)

This is a Powwow at the Stewart Indian school at the Stewart Indian Colony of the Washoe tribe, in Nevada. This shows different kind of rituals in the tribe that went on at the time of a Powwow. This video was published on September 30th, 2011 and helps us understand the Washoe's Tribe music and dance has continued to go on as the years go on.

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